Posts Tagged ‘toddler’

{Wordless Wednesday} Seattle Area Child Photographer

September 4th, 2013

    This post is shared with:   Sakura Haruka The Jenny Evolution That Suburban Momma

 

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{P is for Peacock} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

August 29th, 2013

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. […]

 

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. This was a simple craft, with a little more supervision needed by the toddler (he was much more prone to fingerpaint himself. Part of the painting process, I believe). The end result is beautiful, and so pretty! I hope you enjoy our P is for Peacock picture craft.

What You’ll Need:

  • large sheets of paper (I used a roll of green paper that covered our whole table, then cut out the pictures to size. This was much easier than having them paint to a sheet of smaller paper.)
  • finger paint (Crayola makes a great finger paint that is washable)
  • **alternative** tempera paint (we use this brand also by Crayola that is washable)
  • paper plates big enough for your kids to place their hands in for the paint
  • **optional** paintbrushes (for younger kids, you may want to paint their hands)
  • nearby rags or baby wipes 🙂

 

To Make the Peacock:

  • green handprints for the tail feathers
  • red and yellow thumb prints for “eyes” on the tail feathers
  • blue fist prints for the head and body **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red or yellow thumb print for the beak **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red streaks for the legs, with thumb prints for the feet

P is for Precision. My oldest carefully placing thumbprint “eyes” on his peacock tail.

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P is for Painting. My youngest is two here, and really loved this craft. We helped him paint the peacock body, but he went to town with the handprints for the peacock body.

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P is for Passion.  He *really* got into the painting process.

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P is for Play. Fun and games, and they get some learning in the process as well.

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P is for Peacock. The finished peacock made by my oldest. We framed it and gave it to the grandparents as a gift. He was super proud he made it himself.

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P is for Picture. The finished peacock made by youngest. Not as detailed, but he was also very proud of his finished art piece!

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And in the end,  P is for Pleased and Happy boys!

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{Pennies in Vinegar} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

March 1st, 2012

Another great science website I found is Science Bob. I’ve looked at a ton of “kid’s science experiments!” books but I really wanted to go beyond the basic “baking soda and vinegar” combinations and show them other chemical interactions. When I saw his experiment on  “How To Clean Pennies in Vinegar” I knew that was […]

 

Another great science website I found is Science Bob. I’ve looked at a ton of “kid’s science experiments!” books but I really wanted to go beyond the basic “baking soda and vinegar” combinations and show them other chemical interactions. When I saw his experiment on  “How To Clean Pennies in Vinegar” I knew that was exactly what I was looking for! It involved basic things we had in our house, and showed cool chemical reactions with acids. For more great science experiments, check out Adventures in Mommyness‘s Science Sunday (linky at the bottom of this post)!

 

What You Need:

  • vinegar
  • salt
  • some other type of acid (optional; we used orange juice, you can also use lemon juice)
  • old, dull pennies
  • quarters/dimes/nickes or nuts and bolts (optional)
  • water
  • paper towels

 

We started off with our question: What happens when you put pennies in vinegar and salt? (1/4 cup vinegar to 1 tsp salt)

 

The boys’ hypothesis on what they think will happen.  Samuel thought “it will turn colors”

 

Our liquids! Clockwise: vinegar and salt (dark pink); orange juice (purple); distill water as our “control” (blue); just vinegar (light pink)

 

Pennies before the experiment. I picked nice and dull ones, most of them were before 1969

 

We put pennies in the liquids. You can see the acid cleaning actually starting!

 

We took the pennies out and dried them off. Cool, eh? The boys were very impressed.

 

BONUS! This is what happened to the pennies when we took them out of the vinegar/salt solution and DID NOT dry them off.  (we left them alone for about an hour). The green stuff is a compound called malachite, a copper carbonite, formed with the penny oxidizing (wet copper reacting with the oxygen in the air).

 

After you take the pennies out of the vinegar/salt solution, here’s something else you can do. You can either put nuts/bolts in it, or quarter/dimes/nickels. They will attract the free floating copper ions and turn copperish color. You can see it best on the coins at the bottom of the photo

 

And what we learned: Pennies in vinegar turn “siny” (shiny).

 

Here are some direction comparions of before and after with drying the pennies

 

And a before and after with NOT drying the pennies

 

And the science behind what happened!

 

Science Sunday

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{Leprechaun Trap!} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

February 21st, 2012

Now that the Valentines Day madness is behind us, we look forward to the next holiday and holiday madness. Last year, my boys really got into St. Patrick’s Day, and in particular, if leprechauns were real or not. I found this cool tutorial for a leprechaun trap, and we went to town! What you need: […]

 

Now that the Valentines Day madness is behind us, we look forward to the next holiday and holiday madness. Last year, my boys really got into St. Patrick’s Day, and in particular, if leprechauns were real or not. I found this cool tutorial for a leprechaun trap, and we went to town!

What you need:

  • Round container (I used a Quaker Oats container)
  • Green Paper, black paper, and yellow paper for decorations
  • Sticks (for the ladder)
  • Cotton Ball and Glitter (for the gold)
  • Pocket Knife

This was a pretty easy craft, I had the boys cut out shamrocks and do all the gluing and taping. I put the cotton ball inside a box, let them coat it in watered down glue (to soak into the cotton ball), then glitter the heck out of it. **NOTE** Do this outdoors or it’ll look like a glitter bomb went off in your house. Then we found sticks and hot glued them together to make the ladder.

 

Here is what our finished trap looked like! The sign was very important, as we read that leprechauns don’t like to be told what NOT to do.

Here was the hole we put on top, then we put the “gold nugget” to cover up the hole. The theory was, leprechaun would see the sign, climb up the ladder to take the gold, then fall in and be trapped! 

We put the trap outside the boys’ bedroom window. Here they are eagerly waiting for the leprechaun

And…here is what they discovered. Leprechauns can bust out of traps! You can tell by the outline of the leprechaun the next day. He did however leave some green footprints, and quarters for the boys.

 

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