Posts Tagged ‘sensory’

{P is for Peacock} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

August 29th, 2013

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. […]

 

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. This was a simple craft, with a little more supervision needed by the toddler (he was much more prone to fingerpaint himself. Part of the painting process, I believe). The end result is beautiful, and so pretty! I hope you enjoy our P is for Peacock picture craft.

What You’ll Need:

  • large sheets of paper (I used a roll of green paper that covered our whole table, then cut out the pictures to size. This was much easier than having them paint to a sheet of smaller paper.)
  • finger paint (Crayola makes a great finger paint that is washable)
  • **alternative** tempera paint (we use this brand also by Crayola that is washable)
  • paper plates big enough for your kids to place their hands in for the paint
  • **optional** paintbrushes (for younger kids, you may want to paint their hands)
  • nearby rags or baby wipes 🙂

 

To Make the Peacock:

  • green handprints for the tail feathers
  • red and yellow thumb prints for “eyes” on the tail feathers
  • blue fist prints for the head and body **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red or yellow thumb print for the beak **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red streaks for the legs, with thumb prints for the feet

P is for Precision. My oldest carefully placing thumbprint “eyes” on his peacock tail.

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P is for Painting. My youngest is two here, and really loved this craft. We helped him paint the peacock body, but he went to town with the handprints for the peacock body.

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P is for Passion.  He *really* got into the painting process.

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P is for Play. Fun and games, and they get some learning in the process as well.

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P is for Peacock. The finished peacock made by my oldest. We framed it and gave it to the grandparents as a gift. He was super proud he made it himself.

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P is for Picture. The finished peacock made by youngest. Not as detailed, but he was also very proud of his finished art piece!

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And in the end,  P is for Pleased and Happy boys!

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{Musical Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 5th, 2013

Something that seems to be put on the backburner in education these days is emphasis on the arts and music. I read this awesome article about the principal who placed art teachers back in his school and thought yeah, that’s what I’m talking about! I wish more schools operated that way. I’m always looking for […]

 

Something that seems to be put on the backburner in education these days is emphasis on the arts and music. I read this awesome article about the principal who placed art teachers back in his school and thought yeah, that’s what I’m talking about! I wish more schools operated that way. I’m always looking for activities which combine my preschooler’s need for sensory input, along with anything that encourages art or music. When I found this activity on Pinterest for musical painting, I thought it was the GREATEST THING EVER. It was relatively simple, incorporated sensory inputs through sound and touch, let my preschooler paint, and the supplies were minimal. It went better than I expected! My preschooler is obsessed with the sound of jingle bells, and he loved stroking the fuzziness of the pipe cleaners as well. He spent quite a bit of time mixing paints, and listening to the jingle bells, before he painted his picture. (as a bonus lesson, I just set out the three primary colors for him, and had him mix the rest of the colors he wanted to use. He really enjoyed the color mixing!)

I would consider this a success, and will totally pull this project out again another day!

What You’ll Need:

  • paintbrushes
  • pipe cleaners
  • bells

The supplies.

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Thread the bell onto the pipe cleaner. I did three bells on each pipe cleaner per paint brush.

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Then, wrap the pipe cleaner around the top of the paint brush. You’re done!

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Then, let your kid paint. My preschooler loved hearing the bells jingle as he mixed the paints. He spent a good twenty minutes just mixing paints to hear the jingle sounds before actually painting. I started with just primary colors (blue, red, yellow) and had him make the rest for his art through color mixing.

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Painting and making music.

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He would stop every so often to feel the fuzziness of the pipe cleaner as well. So many sensory sensations!

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The aftermath. Totally worth it, this activity occupied him for about 45 minutes.

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Ta-dah! The finished painting, it’s a dad and a kid walking in the sunshine. 🙂 Go forth now, and do your own musical painting today!

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{Snowmen In Seattle} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

March 5th, 2013

Unlike most of the United States, our region is having (what a local meteorologist calls) the most boring winter in Seattle history. What this means to a seven and four year old boils down to: The Winter Without Snow At The House. This is a major tragedy in their lives, the inability to throw snowballs, […]

 

Unlike most of the United States, our region is having (what a local meteorologist calls) the most boring winter in Seattle history. What this means to a seven and four year old boils down to: The Winter Without Snow At The House. This is a major tragedy in their lives, the inability to throw snowballs, build snow forts, or even make a snowman. To alleviate their disappointment, we’ve been doing some snow and winter themed crafts at our house, to bring the outdoors, inside. We first drew snowmen pictures using chalk (you need dark construction paper for the chalk to show up). Then, we did a more sensory based art project using salt as snow. This was a bit more messy, as both my kids liked playing with the “snow” with their fingers before deciding on what kind of design they wanted to glue.

What You’ll Need:

  • black or dark blue construction paper
  • chalk (we used our regular sidewalk chalk; you can use school chalk as well)
  • salt
  • glue (stick glue was better for the four year old; my seven year old preferred the delicate lines of the Elmer’s bottle)
  • optional: glitter

 

First off, here’s our sidewalk chalk! You could use smaller, school chalk. But who are we kidding, we love sidewalk chalk at our house.The boys were so excited to be able to use it inside the house!

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My oldest working on his snowman picture.

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My youngest working on *his* snowman picture. Yes, pink is his favorite color.

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Snowmen at night!

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Our next snowman art project was much more sensory based, and it included every kid’s favorite, GLITTER!

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I had the boys’ mix it in with some salt to create glittery snow.

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Then, they used glue to outline out their snowman and snow decorations before sprinkling the glitter and salt “snow” onto the paper.

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I thought the salt made very lovely, realistic looking “snow”

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My youngest on the left, with glitter “stars”, and my oldest on the right with glitter candy canes. Overall, fun snowman projects!

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