Posts Tagged ‘preschool’

{P is for Peacock} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

August 29th, 2013

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. […]

 

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. This was a simple craft, with a little more supervision needed by the toddler (he was much more prone to fingerpaint himself. Part of the painting process, I believe). The end result is beautiful, and so pretty! I hope you enjoy our P is for Peacock picture craft.

What You’ll Need:

  • large sheets of paper (I used a roll of green paper that covered our whole table, then cut out the pictures to size. This was much easier than having them paint to a sheet of smaller paper.)
  • finger paint (Crayola makes a great finger paint that is washable)
  • **alternative** tempera paint (we use this brand also by Crayola that is washable)
  • paper plates big enough for your kids to place their hands in for the paint
  • **optional** paintbrushes (for younger kids, you may want to paint their hands)
  • nearby rags or baby wipes ūüôā

 

To Make the Peacock:

  • green handprints for the tail feathers
  • red and yellow thumb prints for “eyes” on the tail feathers
  • blue fist prints for the head and body **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red or yellow thumb print for the beak **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red streaks for the legs, with thumb prints for the feet

P is for Precision. My oldest carefully placing thumbprint “eyes” on his peacock tail.

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P is for Painting. My youngest is two here, and really loved this craft. We helped him paint the peacock body, but he went to town with the handprints for the peacock body.

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P is for Passion.  He *really* got into the painting process.

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P is for Play. Fun and games, and they get some learning in the process as well.

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P is for Peacock. The finished peacock made by my oldest. We framed it and gave it to the grandparents as a gift. He was super proud he made it himself.

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P is for Picture. The finished peacock made by youngest. Not as detailed, but he was also very proud of his finished art piece!

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And in the end,  P is for Pleased and Happy boys!

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{Sponge Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

July 5th, 2013

I’m always looking for fun art ideas for both boys, so when my oldest chose this Usbourne Art book from the store recently, I was really pleased with all the different art techniques it encompassed inside. The techniques vary from beginner to advance, and I was able to adapt some of them for my younger […]

 

I’m always looking for fun art ideas for both boys, so when my oldest chose this Usbourne Art book from the store recently, I was really pleased with all the different art techniques it encompassed inside. The techniques vary from beginner to advance, and I was able to adapt some of them for my younger son to do as well. One of them was ¬†printing, using an eraser. I didn’t have any big erasers on hand to cut up, but I did have sponges, so we cut up a couple of sponges into body parts, and printed and painted away. It was a HUGE hit. It occupied both boys for about an hour, printing out their little people with the sponges, printing out designs, and putting in details with markers and crayons. I would highly recommend it as a good way to learn about body parts, pattern recognition, and just some plain old messy fun!

What You’ll Need

  • sponges
  • paint
  • paper
  • scissors
  • **optional** markers or crayons to draw in more features or details
  • **optional** big erasers instead of sponges

 

Isn’t this just adorable?

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My pile of cut sponges (this is two different kitchen sponges cut)

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You can see how I marked off the sponge to cut out my body parts, and what an assembled sponge person looked like at the end.

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My kids did spend some time just playing with the sponges, making people, rabbits, and other shapes as well before we started painting. A by-product I didn’t expect, I ended up letting them play with the cut sponges in a bowl of water when they were finished painting as well.

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Dip sponge into paint. Press into paper.

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It was fun cutting out different shapes as well, I cut out a triangle body here.

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Dip, press, then add details with markers.

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Have plenty of rags on hand, as my kids also started to sponge paint themselves as well.

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Look at that concentration!

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Dip, press, add details with marker. And repeat.

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Check out the final results! A pogo jumping man. A diver in a pool. All from the same pile of sponges.

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Cowabunga!

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The fun thing about sponges is that, you can bend them to make bendy arms and legs as well.

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You can also use different colors, my oldest here made our family. Happy crafting!

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{Weather Making Science} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

June 20th, 2013

One of the nifty things about living in the Seattle area is that in the month of June, they host a Seattle Science Festival. Last year was the first one, and this year was the second one. One of the fun things we were able to do was attend the NOAA open house here in […]

 

One of the nifty things about living in the Seattle area is that in the month of June, they host a Seattle Science Festival. Last year was the first one, and this year was the second one. One of the fun things we were able to do was attend the NOAA open house here in Seattle last Friday, and my boys and I were entranced by all the things we learned. The NOAA stands for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which means that it studies the oceans, marine animals, and also the weather. The boys and I got to do some interesting experiments on weather modelling and predictions, and when we got home, my youngest asked if we could do some more weather experiments. I looked things up, and found we could make a tornado in a bottle, make rain, and make fog. Sounds like fun!

What You’ll Need To Make Rain or Fog:

  • Jars or Tall glasses (preferrable with wide mouths. I use mason jars)
  • hot water
  • ice cubes
  • strainer
  • plastic plate

 

Here was our set up to make rain. I put hot water in the jar, put the plastic plate on top of the jar, then put ice cubes on top and waited about ten minutes. TO MAKE FOG: the set up is the same, except that instead of a plate on top, you put your ice cubes in a strainer, and only put about an inch of hot water in the glass (fog was too hard to capture on camera, hence no pictures)

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You can see the precipitation forming on the underside of the plate. There will be condensation on the inside of the jar as well, and if you’re patient, you’ll see the “rain” actually come down. HOW IT WORKS: What happens is that the warm air from the hot water collides with the cold air from the ice cubes. For rain, enough water particles will bond together to become heavy enough to become rain drops. For fog, the warm air and cold air mix nearer the ground, thus creating mist. Pretty cool!

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What You’ll Need to Make A Bottle Tornado:

  • Two 2-litre bottles
  • water
  • duct tape
  • washer
  • **optional** colored lamp oil (found at craft stores or hardware stores)
  • **optional** a tornado tube. I would TOTALLY RECOMMEND getting one of these

 

Here is the set up for making a bottle tornado. You want to fill up one of the bottles 2/3 full with water (cold or room temp tap water is fine).

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This is what a tornado tube looks like. It is a plastic tube that you can screw both ends of your 2 litre bottles into, with little leaks.  I got mine at our local toy store for $1.99.

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You don’t need to use lamp oil, but if you do, about 1/4 cup is enough. It just makes the tornado colorful. You can also put in light “debris” such as styrofoam bits, or legos, or use dish washing soap to make a “bubbly” tornado. We chose a red tornado, and used a funnel to put it inside the 2 litre bottle.

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If you don’t use a tornado tube, you’ll need to put the washer on top of the bottome 2 litre bottle.

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Then, put the empty 2 litre bottle on top of the washer. Make sure it lines up.

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Duct tape the two bottles together, and swirl in a circular motion to make centrifugal force to create your tornado.

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TORNADO! if you don’t add colored oil, your tornado will still be impressive looking, such as our tornado on the right. **BE WARNED** if you use the washer/duct tape method, after a few tornadoes your duct tape becomes gummy and the bottles fall apart and you will have to re-tape. This is why I recommend the tornado tube if you want to do the experiment more than once.

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We brought our bottle tornado to my oldest son’s end of year school picnic, and it was a big hit. The kids got to make a dancing tornado.

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And there you have it, tornado in a bottle!

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DID YOU KNOW? After our experimentation, my older son asked what was the biggest raindrop ever recorded. We had to look it up, and found out some really interesting facts about raindrops!

  • raindrops are on average .1mm to .2mm big
  • the biggest a raindrop usually occurs in nature is .5mm
  • the biggest recorded raindrop was between .6mm or .8mm
  • raindrops bigger than .2mm are not “tear drop” shaped, but rather “hamburger” shaped. the force of falling often will split the “hamburger” shape raindrop into two

We also learned some facts about tornadoes:

  • tornadoes in water are called waterspouts
  • In the southern hemisphere tornadoes usually rotate in a clockwise direction.
  • In the northern hemisphere tornadoes usually rotate in a counterclockwise direction.
  • tornado wind speeds usually are under 100 mph, but can reach over 300 mph!

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{Preschool Pen Pals} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

June 19th, 2013

A couple of years ago, a friend of mine came to visit Seattle and brought along her adorable little daughter. She and my youngest (who are similarly aged), got along fabulously. When she contacted me about a cool project she had in mind about keeping them in contact, I was delighted to tell my youngest […]

 

A couple of years ago, a friend of mine came to visit Seattle and brought along her adorable little daughter. She and my youngest (who are similarly aged), got along fabulously. When she contacted me about a cool project she had in mind about keeping them in contact, I was delighted to tell my youngest about it, and he was all over the idea of keeping in touch with his buddy.

Basically, her idea was based off of the¬†The¬†Flat Stanley¬†Project, which in turn¬†is based off the Flat Stanley book. Flat Stanley encourages children to write letters, mailing their own “Flat Stanley” to friends and relatives. Not only does it teach kids about writing, reading, and geography, but it’s pretty fun because let’s face it, who doesn’t love receiving mail? If you have a preschool aged child, this is a wonderful project because instead of writing letters, you can practice with taking pictures, and then having your child write a few words (like their name, or city, or their friend’s name). My friend names her the “Flat D” project, and mailed us a picture she made of her daughter. She drew a picture, glued a real photo of her daughter’s face, and laminated the whole thing when it was mailed to us. On our end, we took “Flat D.” around town, with us on camping trips, and wrote a few words about it. My youngest was super excited to have an opportunity to have a preschool pen pal to share pictures and his adventures with from the summer. I really enjoyed this project because with the picture taking, we were able to make a list of what he wanted to show “Flat D.”, and he wasn’t frustrated by his lack of writing skills. In turn, my youngest enjoyed playing tour guide with his very own agenda (instead of mom or dad’s) around town, telling me important things about Seattle and surrounding areas that we needed to show “Flat D”. Most of all, he enjoyed having a preschool aged “pen pal” of his own. It was a great project!

What You’ll Need:

 

My youngest and his new bud, “D”. Aren’t they sweet?

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He was super excited when “Flat D.” came to town, we immediately had to take her to the playground.

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“I love her mommy! I want to show her everything!”

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We took her to show her some of the highlights of our town, including the blue trees.

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Here you can see how “Flat D.” was made, she was very hardy for all the travels.

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She even went camping and visited Deception Pass.

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Hello “Flat D.”!

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My preschooler was brave and took her out on the canoe as well.

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It was fun playing tourist in my own town, with my preschooler being in charge of the agenda. We went to the “dancing stage” at the Seattle Center.

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We visited the statuary in front of the Seattle Childrens Theatre.

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We checked out the oversized exhibit at The Pacific Science Center.

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Don’t be scared, “Flat D.”, it’s not a real dinosaur.

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We checked out a game of vertical tic tac toe. I think my preschooler was winning. ūüôā

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He also had “Flat D.” check out the mechanical kinetic water shooters. She went “oooooOOOOoooo”.

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Goodbye, “Flat D.” Thanks for visiting! Maybe this summer, we’ll make a “Flat A.” and mail him to you to visit! ūüôā

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{Sandpaper Art T-Shirts} Seattle Area Childrens Photographer

May 29th, 2013

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the […]

 

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the boys, and the results were great! Not only was it incredibly easy to do, it took very little supervision from me, and the final result was ¬†beautiful. Now the boys are super excited to design one for dad for Father’s Day! PLEASE NOTE: since you will be transferring the picture upside down from your sandpaper, the image on the T-shirt will be a mirror image of what your child drew. So, I would stay away from any words (which will get transferred on backwards), and stick to simple images.

What You’ll Need

  • sandpaper (I used both coarse 60 grit, and a finer 220 grit. coarser will get you more texture, finer will let you get more details in your drawing)
  • crayons
  • white t shirts
  • iron
  • paper towel or regular towel
  • ***IMPORTANT*** since the drawing will be placed backwards to be ironed onto the t shirt, whatever you draw will be mirrored on the t shirt. So it is best NOT to draw any words.

 

This is all you’ll need for this craft (minus the iron). The two different sandpaper is a bonus – you can get away with one type!

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 First, draw your picture onto the sandpaper. I let my youngest use the coarser grit sandpaper.

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My oldest wanted more details in his drawing, so I let him have the finer grit sandpaper.

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My youngest and his finished sandpaper drawing. He wanted to fill up his whole piece of sandpaper.

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He didn’t really believe me that it would print onto the t shirt.

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Second, place your sandpaper upside down on your t shirt, and iron on the COTTON setting (with no steam). I also placed a paper towel in between the t shirt to make sure there was no bleed through. I ironed for about 2 minutes, the coarser sandpaper took longer than the finer grit one. Just keep lifting up to check to make sure the crayon has melted onto the shirt.

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Voila! That is it, two easy steps! That is how you make a sandpaper art t shirt. To “set” your design, take a paper towel (or a cotton towel), and iron for about 20 seconds on top of your crayon design.

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A close up of my older son’s design. I love the surf boards.

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Happy, happy kids! They loved that they were able to make their own shirts, and tell people they designed it themselves. Next, we are working on a design for dad’s shirt for Father’s Day (SHHHHHH don’t tell him). Happy Crafting!

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{Spin Art} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 24th, 2013

In the summer, one of the things my kids love to do is go to the state fair. There, besides the carnival rides and gorging on cotton candy, they love doing the Spin Art. I dutifully bought one of the Spin Art machines, only to find that a) paint got EVERYWHERE, ¬†b) my younger son […]

 

In the summer, one of the things my kids love to do is go to the state fair. There, besides the carnival rides and gorging on cotton candy, they love doing the Spin Art. I dutifully bought one of the Spin Art machines, only to find that a) paint got EVERYWHERE, ¬†b) my younger son couldn’t really use it without major, MAJOR supervision and c) the machine broke easily with enthusiastic usage. When I found this method of “spin art” online, I was pleased as punch to try to put it in action. All I needed was a salad spinner, which I sent my husband to look for at a thrift store. It worked beautifully, the paint mess was contained, and my preschooler-aged son LOVED the process. As some added side bonuses, we got to learn about some color mixing when we had some primary colors blend together in the salad spinner, we got to talk about centrifugal (or spinning) force, and we started on some cool Father’s Day cards. I would highly recommend this craft for toddlers on up to elementary aged kids as well!

What You’ll Need:

  • Salad Spinner (we got ours at the thrift shop for $2.50!)
  • paint (use a variety! we used both watercolors, tempura, and acrylics to see which “spins” the best)
  • paper (a heavier paper, like a watercolor paper, is better because it didn’t fly up during the spinning process. If you use regular sheet paper, I would tape two together to make it heavier).
  • experiment with your paper shapes inside the spinner. we cut out both squares and circles. I liked the look of the squares, but my son and both agreed the circles ended up looking the coolest.

 

Stick the paper inside the bottom of the spinner, then have your kiddo sploosh some paint on the inside.  This was acrylic paint. I let my preschooler choose whatever color combinations he wanted to pick.

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Set the top, and spin! This was my preschooler’s FAVORITE part. I cannot stress enough how much he enjoyed the pumping of the spinning top. We have another salad spinner which has a rotating spinner, but the pumping spinner was the hands down winner.

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Pretty! The acrylic paint was heavier, and didn’t “spin” as far as we thought it would.

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Here is where we experimented with watercolors, and round paper. I love how the black and white mixed to form grey. We did some other color mixing as well, and it turned into an impromptu color mixing lesson. I think the one on the right looks like the earth.

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This one is my favorite. I love how it looks almost like a flower pattern. We made quite a few more, and are going to use it to make cards for Father’s Day. Next time, we’re going to try to figure out how to add paint while it is actually spinning. Overall, this was a fun craft, and when my older son came home he immediately wanted to do his own “spin art” as well. Four thumbs up!

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{Cornstarch Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 16th, 2013

If you’ve visited my blog ¬†before, you should know that my boys love art, especially painting. Buying paint all the time for projects can get pricey, so when I saw this easy way to make my own paint from just stuff I had at home, I was all over it. It takes cornstarch, water, and […]

 

If you’ve visited my blog ¬†before, you should know that my boys love art, especially painting. Buying paint all the time for projects can get pricey, so when I saw this easy way to make my own paint from just stuff I had at home, I was all over it. It takes cornstarch, water, and food coloring to make your own paint. You have to play with the ratio of cornstarch to water. I think our ratio was one tablespoon of cornstarch to one cup of water. I started with one tablespoon of cornstarch and added in water until it got to a watercolor-paint like consistency. If you want a thicker consistency like tempura paint, I would go with 1/2 or 2/3 cup of water. Then, since it was a beautiful day, I set the boys up outside with butcher paper laid out on the driveway, and let them go to town. They had sooooo much fun. I was pleasantly surprised at how bright the colors in the cornstarch paint turned out. In the end, the boys ended up mixing all the colors together to a muddy brown, ditched the paint brushes, and painted with their hands and feet. ¬†Overall, it was fun, messy, creative, and colorful. We hung up the finished painting in the garaged and labeled it “Our World”.

What You’ll Need:

  • cornstarch (arrowroot powder may work as well, but I haven’t tested it)
  • water
  • food coloring
  • paintbrushes
  • some sort of cup to hold it
  • **optional** muffin tin or other holder to hold it for transport

Again, our ratio was 1 tablespoon cornstarch : 1 cup water. You can play with the ratio to the consistency you desire.

 

We mixed our cornstarch paint in cups, then I put the cups in a muffin tin for easier transport. Look at the colors!

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I was amazed at how vivid the colors showed up once the boys started painting. Look at the tasty watermelons.

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Of course, then they started to experiment with painting with their hands as well.

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It made for great sensory play!

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It was a warm weekend, so perfect for some outdoor painting. I laid out a big roll of butcher paper outside for them to paint. I also stripped them down for easier clean up afterwards. They were totally into the process.

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My oldest just started dipping his hands into the cup for full immersion. I think he was starting to channel his inner Jackson Pollack.

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Then, they both got into the full body, painting action. Overall, it was an easy, cheap (!), and fun way to paint! Happy painting!

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{Musical Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 5th, 2013

Something that seems to be put on the backburner in education these days is emphasis on the arts and music. I read this awesome article about the principal who placed art teachers back in his school and thought yeah, that’s what I’m talking about! I wish more schools operated that way. I’m always looking for […]

 

Something that seems to be put on the backburner in education these days is emphasis on the arts and music. I read this awesome article about the principal who placed art teachers back in his school and thought yeah, that’s what I’m talking about! I wish more schools operated that way. I’m always looking for activities which combine my preschooler’s need for sensory input, along with anything that encourages art or music. When I found this activity on Pinterest for musical painting, I thought it was the GREATEST THING EVER. It was relatively simple, incorporated sensory inputs through sound and touch, let my preschooler paint, and the supplies were minimal. It went better than I expected! My preschooler is obsessed with the sound of jingle bells, and he loved stroking the fuzziness of the pipe cleaners as well. He spent quite a bit of time mixing paints, and listening to the jingle bells, before he painted his picture. (as a bonus lesson, I just set out the three primary colors for him, and had him mix the rest of the colors he wanted to use. He really enjoyed the color mixing!)

I would consider this a success, and will totally pull this project out again another day!

What You’ll Need:

  • paintbrushes
  • pipe cleaners
  • bells

The supplies.

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Thread the bell onto the pipe cleaner. I did three bells on each pipe cleaner per paint brush.

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Then, wrap the pipe cleaner around the top of the paint brush. You’re done!

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Then, let your kid paint. My preschooler loved hearing the bells jingle as he mixed the paints. He spent a good twenty minutes just mixing paints to hear the jingle sounds before actually painting. I started with just primary colors (blue, red, yellow) and had him make the rest for his art through color mixing.

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Painting and making music.

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He would stop every so often to feel the fuzziness of the pipe cleaner as well. So many sensory sensations!

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The aftermath. Totally worth it, this activity occupied him for about 45 minutes.

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Ta-dah! The finished painting, it’s a dad and a kid walking in the sunshine. ūüôā Go forth now, and do your own musical painting today!

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{Upcycled Rubber Bracelets} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

April 17th, 2013

Living in the beautiful PNW, we’re incredibly lucky that we have access to beautiful scenery and bike trails. We’re a big biking family, whether it be a short trip around the block, or a family bike ride on the trail, plus it’s a fun and easy way to get some family time. My husband is […]

 

Living in the beautiful PNW, we’re incredibly lucky that we have access to beautiful scenery and bike trails. We’re a big biking family, whether it be a short trip around the block, or a family bike ride on the trail, plus it’s a fun and easy way to get some family time. My husband is the big biking advocate in the family, and he took the boys to the annual Seattle Bike Expo, where they got see cool trick riding by Ryan Leech, see the latest in bike innovations, and also came home with these nifty, funky bracelets. Once I realized that they were just made from inner bike tubes, and that we had those at home, I totally recreated them for the boys to make some more (and some for me, too!). This is a great craft to help celebrate Earth Day. It’s also a fairly easy craft, made for some fun jewelry, plus the boys got to wear something to symbolize the bike riding they loved.

What You’ll Need:

  • inner bike tubes
  • snaps
  • snap setter (I used this Snap Setter)
  • paint or Sharpie Paint Pens¬†(OIL based, not the water based paint pens)
  • scissors
  • hammer

 

Can I just bottle the look of joy here on my oldest’s face? Can you also spot my preschooler peeking out from behind dad on the trail-a-long bike?

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Our preschool took a trip to the Cascade Recycling Center recently. This is ALL recycling. Can you believe it? Less than 5% per year of what gets collected for recycling actually is garbage and not recycled by the Center. One of the things the recycling center does *not* take is rubber, so our project was a good use of the rubber of the inner bike tire tubes.

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This is the inner bike tube.

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You’re going to cut it, and make it long enough to fit across your wrist (make sure to account for length for the snap overlength). You can cut it in different widths as well.

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With the snaps put on it. You can leave the edges flat, or round it. You can see I made them in various widths, and left one side flat, and rounded

one side.

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Here are the Sharpie paint pens I used. I used the oil based, fine point, NON OPAQUE pens.

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It made for a very fine point for drawing.  This method was better for me and for my older, elementary aged son, since it gave him more ability to get detailed in his drying. The pens were also quick drying to boot!

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Another way to decorate is with stamps and paint. I used acrylic paint and rubber stamps.

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The stamping method is good for toddlers and preschoolers to decorate. It does take overnight to dry.

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And the finished bracelet, this one was sharpie pen decorated.

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Here are some stamped one. I also tested out velcro instead of snaps, but liked the look of the snaps better.

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Overall, a really fun project, and my kids LOVE their new, fun and funky upcycled bracelets!

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{Math + Arth = FUN} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

April 9th, 2013

My preschooler loves math. He also loves arts and crafts, but everyone knows his real love is math. Most of the time, I’m able to combine the two together in a “lesson” to teach him something math related, while we’re creating something fun. Did you know that mathematics is sometimes called, the “science of patterns”? […]

 

My preschooler loves math. He also loves arts and crafts, but everyone knows his real love is math. Most of the time, I’m able to combine the two together in a “lesson” to teach him something math related, while we’re creating something fun. Did you know that mathematics is sometimes called, the “science of patterns”? Think about it! ¬†Patterns happen everywhere, whether it’s in repeating numbers, colors, shapes, or expressions. By showing kids to look for a pattern, you’re teaching them the basics of problem solving.

For this craft, I had all these leftover little squares of construction paper. We decided that we would make a spring flower craft out of them, using different shapes. We did circles, triangles, and squares. This was a fun craft because we got to talk about shapes, patterns, AND make a cool art project at the end to show off!

What We Did:

  • for the triangles, we used two colors as petals, and laid them down in a pattern. The placement of which way the triangle went wasn’t important, the pattern of which color went next was the important part.
  • for the circles, I traced out circles from big to small, and had him cut it out. Then he glued them in descending order, biggest to smallest, learning about sizes as well.
  • For the squares, we left them the same size, and just layered them on top of each other, with an additional circle for the middle.

 

My leftover pieces of construction paper. They were perfect for this project.

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I had my preschooler cut out circles. We also cut the squares diagonally to make triangles, and finally left them as they were in order to have our three different shapes.

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He also cut and glued on some grass, and flower stems.

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For the triangle shapes, we used two different colors to make a repeating pattern. It didn’t matter the orientation of the triangle, what mattered was the COLOR PATTERN.¬†

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For the circles, we went from biggest, to medium, to smallest. Again, learning sizes is another math concept at work here!

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For the squares, we put them together and talked about how they made a pretty shape together, and how flowers in nature can look like that as well, like gerber daisies (which happen to be one of my favorite flowers).

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And our final product! Circles, triangles, and squares all working together to make a beautiful flower art craft. In the meantime, it also taught my preschooler some patterns, shape and sizes recognition, and how nature also uses math. So go forth, have fun, and mix math and art together!

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