Posts Tagged ‘painting’

{P is for Peacock} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

August 29th, 2013

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. […]

 

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. This was a simple craft, with a little more supervision needed by the toddler (he was much more prone to fingerpaint himself. Part of the painting process, I believe). The end result is beautiful, and so pretty! I hope you enjoy our P is for Peacock picture craft.

What You’ll Need:

  • large sheets of paper (I used a roll of green paper that covered our whole table, then cut out the pictures to size. This was much easier than having them paint to a sheet of smaller paper.)
  • finger paint (Crayola makes a great finger paint that is washable)
  • **alternative** tempera paint (we use this brand also by Crayola that is washable)
  • paper plates big enough for your kids to place their hands in for the paint
  • **optional** paintbrushes (for younger kids, you may want to paint their hands)
  • nearby rags or baby wipes 🙂

 

To Make the Peacock:

  • green handprints for the tail feathers
  • red and yellow thumb prints for “eyes” on the tail feathers
  • blue fist prints for the head and body **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red or yellow thumb print for the beak **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red streaks for the legs, with thumb prints for the feet

P is for Precision. My oldest carefully placing thumbprint “eyes” on his peacock tail.

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P is for Painting. My youngest is two here, and really loved this craft. We helped him paint the peacock body, but he went to town with the handprints for the peacock body.

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P is for Passion.  He *really* got into the painting process.

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P is for Play. Fun and games, and they get some learning in the process as well.

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P is for Peacock. The finished peacock made by my oldest. We framed it and gave it to the grandparents as a gift. He was super proud he made it himself.

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P is for Picture. The finished peacock made by youngest. Not as detailed, but he was also very proud of his finished art piece!

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And in the end,  P is for Pleased and Happy boys!

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{Rock Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

July 17th, 2013

If your kids are anything like mine, they like to collect things like rocks. (And sticks. Sometimes I get a surprise and it’s something that’s alive such as a worm or beetle. Or baby spiders, although that is totally another post once I recover from the trauma). Then, when you try to tell them that […]

 

If your kids are anything like mine, they like to collect things like rocks. (And sticks. Sometimes I get a surprise and it’s something that’s alive such as a worm or beetle. Or baby spiders, although that is totally another post once I recover from the trauma). Then, when you try to tell them that their “treasures” belong outside the house, you get tears and lots and lots of wailing. Here’s a simple craft you can do to occupy them, decorate up their “treasure” rocks, plus it’s actually pretty fun. As an added bonus, I even convinced mine that the pretty rocks can stay outside and not clutter up their rooms, or be used as projectiles for sibling battles. My boys love rock painting, we do it several times a year, for all holidays, rainy day activities, or even just for fun on a sunshiney day.

What You’ll Need:

  • rocks (cleaned and dry – my kids love giving their rocks a “bath”)
  • paint (we used tempura and acrylic)
  • brushes (don’t be limited to just paint brushes. We also used pencil top erasers, toothpicks, and q-tips as “brushes”)
  • **optional** you can also use glue and glitter on your rocks as well!

 

Start off with some clean and DRY rocks

Our painting set up. I have box lids for the actual rock painting, just so there’s not accidental floor paintage

Then, get your paint. I set mine out in paper plates for my boys.

Then, let them paint!

Here’s what dot painting with a pencil end looks like as well.

Some of our finished creations.

My oldest was super proud of his Captain America shield rock.

We even glittered some rocks to make them look like real “treasures”

In rock land, Hello Kitty and Batman live side by side in peace

We painted some to look like caterpillers and bugs

And my youngest loves all things ladybugs. Happy crafting!

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{Spin Art} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 24th, 2013

In the summer, one of the things my kids love to do is go to the state fair. There, besides the carnival rides and gorging on cotton candy, they love doing the Spin Art. I dutifully bought one of the Spin Art machines, only to find that a) paint got EVERYWHERE,  b) my younger son […]

 

In the summer, one of the things my kids love to do is go to the state fair. There, besides the carnival rides and gorging on cotton candy, they love doing the Spin Art. I dutifully bought one of the Spin Art machines, only to find that a) paint got EVERYWHERE,  b) my younger son couldn’t really use it without major, MAJOR supervision and c) the machine broke easily with enthusiastic usage. When I found this method of “spin art” online, I was pleased as punch to try to put it in action. All I needed was a salad spinner, which I sent my husband to look for at a thrift store. It worked beautifully, the paint mess was contained, and my preschooler-aged son LOVED the process. As some added side bonuses, we got to learn about some color mixing when we had some primary colors blend together in the salad spinner, we got to talk about centrifugal (or spinning) force, and we started on some cool Father’s Day cards. I would highly recommend this craft for toddlers on up to elementary aged kids as well!

What You’ll Need:

  • Salad Spinner (we got ours at the thrift shop for $2.50!)
  • paint (use a variety! we used both watercolors, tempura, and acrylics to see which “spins” the best)
  • paper (a heavier paper, like a watercolor paper, is better because it didn’t fly up during the spinning process. If you use regular sheet paper, I would tape two together to make it heavier).
  • experiment with your paper shapes inside the spinner. we cut out both squares and circles. I liked the look of the squares, but my son and both agreed the circles ended up looking the coolest.

 

Stick the paper inside the bottom of the spinner, then have your kiddo sploosh some paint on the inside.  This was acrylic paint. I let my preschooler choose whatever color combinations he wanted to pick.

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Set the top, and spin! This was my preschooler’s FAVORITE part. I cannot stress enough how much he enjoyed the pumping of the spinning top. We have another salad spinner which has a rotating spinner, but the pumping spinner was the hands down winner.

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Pretty! The acrylic paint was heavier, and didn’t “spin” as far as we thought it would.

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Here is where we experimented with watercolors, and round paper. I love how the black and white mixed to form grey. We did some other color mixing as well, and it turned into an impromptu color mixing lesson. I think the one on the right looks like the earth.

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This one is my favorite. I love how it looks almost like a flower pattern. We made quite a few more, and are going to use it to make cards for Father’s Day. Next time, we’re going to try to figure out how to add paint while it is actually spinning. Overall, this was a fun craft, and when my older son came home he immediately wanted to do his own “spin art” as well. Four thumbs up!

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{Cornstarch Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 16th, 2013

If you’ve visited my blog  before, you should know that my boys love art, especially painting. Buying paint all the time for projects can get pricey, so when I saw this easy way to make my own paint from just stuff I had at home, I was all over it. It takes cornstarch, water, and […]

 

If you’ve visited my blog  before, you should know that my boys love art, especially painting. Buying paint all the time for projects can get pricey, so when I saw this easy way to make my own paint from just stuff I had at home, I was all over it. It takes cornstarch, water, and food coloring to make your own paint. You have to play with the ratio of cornstarch to water. I think our ratio was one tablespoon of cornstarch to one cup of water. I started with one tablespoon of cornstarch and added in water until it got to a watercolor-paint like consistency. If you want a thicker consistency like tempura paint, I would go with 1/2 or 2/3 cup of water. Then, since it was a beautiful day, I set the boys up outside with butcher paper laid out on the driveway, and let them go to town. They had sooooo much fun. I was pleasantly surprised at how bright the colors in the cornstarch paint turned out. In the end, the boys ended up mixing all the colors together to a muddy brown, ditched the paint brushes, and painted with their hands and feet.  Overall, it was fun, messy, creative, and colorful. We hung up the finished painting in the garaged and labeled it “Our World”.

What You’ll Need:

  • cornstarch (arrowroot powder may work as well, but I haven’t tested it)
  • water
  • food coloring
  • paintbrushes
  • some sort of cup to hold it
  • **optional** muffin tin or other holder to hold it for transport

Again, our ratio was 1 tablespoon cornstarch : 1 cup water. You can play with the ratio to the consistency you desire.

 

We mixed our cornstarch paint in cups, then I put the cups in a muffin tin for easier transport. Look at the colors!

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I was amazed at how vivid the colors showed up once the boys started painting. Look at the tasty watermelons.

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Of course, then they started to experiment with painting with their hands as well.

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It made for great sensory play!

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It was a warm weekend, so perfect for some outdoor painting. I laid out a big roll of butcher paper outside for them to paint. I also stripped them down for easier clean up afterwards. They were totally into the process.

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My oldest just started dipping his hands into the cup for full immersion. I think he was starting to channel his inner Jackson Pollack.

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Then, they both got into the full body, painting action. Overall, it was an easy, cheap (!), and fun way to paint! Happy painting!

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{Musical Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 5th, 2013

Something that seems to be put on the backburner in education these days is emphasis on the arts and music. I read this awesome article about the principal who placed art teachers back in his school and thought yeah, that’s what I’m talking about! I wish more schools operated that way. I’m always looking for […]

 

Something that seems to be put on the backburner in education these days is emphasis on the arts and music. I read this awesome article about the principal who placed art teachers back in his school and thought yeah, that’s what I’m talking about! I wish more schools operated that way. I’m always looking for activities which combine my preschooler’s need for sensory input, along with anything that encourages art or music. When I found this activity on Pinterest for musical painting, I thought it was the GREATEST THING EVER. It was relatively simple, incorporated sensory inputs through sound and touch, let my preschooler paint, and the supplies were minimal. It went better than I expected! My preschooler is obsessed with the sound of jingle bells, and he loved stroking the fuzziness of the pipe cleaners as well. He spent quite a bit of time mixing paints, and listening to the jingle bells, before he painted his picture. (as a bonus lesson, I just set out the three primary colors for him, and had him mix the rest of the colors he wanted to use. He really enjoyed the color mixing!)

I would consider this a success, and will totally pull this project out again another day!

What You’ll Need:

  • paintbrushes
  • pipe cleaners
  • bells

The supplies.

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Thread the bell onto the pipe cleaner. I did three bells on each pipe cleaner per paint brush.

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Then, wrap the pipe cleaner around the top of the paint brush. You’re done!

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Then, let your kid paint. My preschooler loved hearing the bells jingle as he mixed the paints. He spent a good twenty minutes just mixing paints to hear the jingle sounds before actually painting. I started with just primary colors (blue, red, yellow) and had him make the rest for his art through color mixing.

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Painting and making music.

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He would stop every so often to feel the fuzziness of the pipe cleaner as well. So many sensory sensations!

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The aftermath. Totally worth it, this activity occupied him for about 45 minutes.

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Ta-dah! The finished painting, it’s a dad and a kid walking in the sunshine. 🙂 Go forth now, and do your own musical painting today!

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{Garden Plant Markers} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

March 28th, 2013

Here in the Seattle area, it’s definitely SPRING! And with spring, comes the annual spring planting. My kids love gardening as much as I do, and one of our favorite projects we did last year was making plant markers for the garden. This was a relatively inexpensive project that was easy, FUN, and totally engaging […]

 

Here in the Seattle area, it’s definitely SPRING! And with spring, comes the annual spring planting. My kids love gardening as much as I do, and one of our favorite projects we did last year was making plant markers for the garden. This was a relatively inexpensive project that was easy, FUN, and totally engaging for both my boys. As a bonus, they love their little works of art all around the yard, and proudly show them off to everyone who comes along and asks.

 What You’ll Need:

  • Canning Lids (I used both wide mouth, and regular size)
  • paint (I used acrylic to withstand the weather outside. I do not think tempura would be a good choice)
  • bamboo skewers (to use for the posts)
  • glue (I used my trust E6000, but you can also just use a hot glue gun)
  • Sharpie Paint Pens (I used this to write the names of all the produce)

 

We start off with our “canvas”, aka the canning jar lids.

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I set up my boys outside. First, we painted all the lids white. In hindsight, I would not do this step again as they just painted over the whole thing anyway. But, it made for a nice, clean looking backdrop. Then, I set them up with acrylic paints on paper plates, paintbrushes, pencils (to use as dobbers) and let them go to town. They each got a mix of big and little canning lids to paint.

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Good thing acrylic paint is washable. My youngest was more prone to paint himself.

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This was a Very Serious Project.

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Finished! I loved how creative and free form their paintings were, and I was really looking forward to the little works of art to put in the garden. 

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Some of their favorites they asked to photograph. Red poppy, rainbow, sun, treehouse (red blobby thing in the bottom left corner)

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Overnight, I let the lids dry. then, I glued the bamboo skewers onto the back, and wrote the names of whatever we were planting on the front with the Sharpie paint pen.

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He was very excited to go put them in the garden!

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A close up of what they looked like in the ground.

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And our herb garden. Overall, a very satisfying project! My kids love showing off their works of art, and as a bonus, now my husband knows where to find everything when I send him to snip me some herbs for dinner. 🙂

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Made By You Mondays

Monday Fundays by C.R.A.F.T

Motive Me Mondays

 It’s Party Time! (It’s So Very Cheri)

 Mad Craft Skills Party

 Get Your Craft On!

 Teach Me Stuff! (Hope Studios)

 What’s It Wednesday

We Did It Wednesday

Wicked Awesome Wednesday

Wow Me Wednesday

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{Spring is in the air} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

March 11th, 2012

We had a gorgeous day on thursday this week, with the sun shining, and spring in the air. The buds are beginning to come out on the trees, and our plum trees were blooming as well. I saw this cool craft on pinterest painting blossoms with the bottom of 2 litre bottles, and thought it […]

 

We had a gorgeous day on thursday this week, with the sun shining, and spring in the air. The buds are beginning to come out on the trees, and our plum trees were blooming as well. I saw this cool craft on pinterest painting blossoms with the bottom of 2 litre bottles, and thought it would be a fun craft to do with the boys. Of course, this weekend has been grey, mucky, and rainy, but we got to bring a little bit of spring inside our homes yesterday. This craft is also part of the Kids Weekly Coop at Lets Lasso The Moon! Come check out all the other cool crafts and science ideas there!

 

What you need:

  • paint (we used blue, black, and pink)
  • 2 litre bottles
  • brushes
  • straws
  • paper
Our inspiration, our blooming plum trees

 

For our first painting, we started off with a blob of black paint. I think I thinned ours down with water a little bit too much, you want to thin it a little bit so it’s easy to blow, but not too thin

Then, I had the boys blow the black paint around to make a tree

This was the fun part. Then, I let them splatter the pink paint onto the canvas to make blossoms. They totally LOVED doing this. WARNING: this is a messy craft.

Splatter splatter splatter!

Our finished splattered trees. It looks very abstract, and the boys loved making it. Here was my six year old’s finished painting

 

My three year old’s splatter tree.

 

For the second painting, I had the boys paint the background a sky color. I let them choose how much they wanted to cover the paper.

 

Then, we painted on trees and used the 2 L bottle as a blossom print maker.

 

And our finished print blossom trees. Here is my six year old’s project.

 

Here is my three year old’s painting.

 

Overall, these were two really fun projects to do, and the boys heartily enjoyed themselves. Yes, they got very messy, and I had pink paint splatters everywhere, but the glow of pride in their faces seeing their finished paintings was worth all the mess. We’re going to be hanging these little windows of spring around our house to enjoy to counteract the greyness outside. I hope you guys have fun with your own little ones doing this project!

 

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{Boy Room Decor, Part 2} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

February 19th, 2012

Having two artistic and opinionated boys results in a lot of not-so-subtle parental guidance towards room decor. I have already talked about some of the decorating we’ve done in the boys’ shared room in my boy room decor, part 1 post. In this post, I’ll talk about the art gallery arrangement we have up on […]

 

Having two artistic and opinionated boys results in a lot of not-so-subtle parental guidance towards room decor. I have already talked about some of the decorating we’ve done in the boys’ shared room in my boy room decor, part 1 post. In this post, I’ll talk about the art gallery arrangement we have up on the wall to display the copious amounts of artwork the boys seem to churn out. Younger brother also finally gave us his approval on what he wanted for his part of the bunk bed, so we have the finished rocketship bunk bed as well. Hooray!

Here is what our art wall gallery looks like. The IMAGINE letters were cut by my husband and painted by the boys. I strung picture wire on nails to make the two rows. The wooden turtle, train, sailboat and soccer ball were purchased at Michael’s and also painted by the boys. They are there to cover up the nail heads.

I used clothespins to pin the pictures to the picture wire. We cut out the stars from scrapbook paper, then glued them to the clothespin for a fancier look

My son shows off how pleased he was to finally have someplace he could display his work.

My husband dressed the boys in preparation for their help with painting the rocket ship.

Little brother was very intent on helping

Big brother was much better on spreading on a thin coat of primer, as opposed to the glupping on that little brother was doing. 🙂

And…ta dah! The finished rocket ship bed!

Can you spot the three year old? He loves his new, sleek rocket ship bed.

 

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{Boy Room Decor, part 1} – Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

January 27th, 2012

We live in a three bedroom rambler, which means limited bedroom space. Neither my husband nor I were willing to give up the bedroom we had turned into a study so each boy could have his own bedroom. Since our home was built in the awesome 70s, the bedrooms are a decent enough size to […]

 

We live in a three bedroom rambler, which means limited bedroom space. Neither my husband nor I were willing to give up the bedroom we had turned into a study so each boy could have his own bedroom. Since our home was built in the awesome 70s, the bedrooms are a decent enough size to have the boys share. To maximize floor/playspace, we have them in a bunk bed, and gave them some leeway in room decor. When they are teenagers, this free reign in room decorating may come back to bite me on the behind, but for now, both boys love their room, and are extremely happy to spend time in it both individually and as playmates. Parts of the works in progress include painting the room something else other than gender neutral teal, making a matching alien spaceship for the bottom bunk, and maybe even investing in real furniture. Baby steps though, right now! Baby boy decorating steps, that is. 🙂

 

The boys have a bunk bed, and we made this awesome rocket ship to enclose my oldest in the top bunk. (he is a big mover in his sleep, and already fell out before we put it up). Big kudos and credit go to my husband who designed the layout and painted the rocketship.

 

The door to their room needed to be either replaced or refinished or…something. It was peeling. There were scuff marks. So, we did a painting project. First, we painted little boy feet. For any of you out there, I would suggest if you do this with a three year old, make sure a parent HOLDS THEIR FEET APART, or you may get streak pink/green feet like we did.

Next, we let them walk with their painted feet on the door.

 

Then, we painted their hands.

 

And voila, we have an easily decorated and fun boy’ room door. I dated it for prosterity at the top.

I also put names by each set of hand and foot prints. I admit, I got a little sniffly seeing how close in size my boys’ hands and foot prints are these days. They are growing up so quickly, I thought it was a nice reminder of how little they are now.

 

And there you have it, what two boys, some paint, and a little creativity can do to decorate a room. In boy decor, part 2, I’ll showcase how we made an art wall to hang up the gazillion pieces of preschool and elementary school artwork that they come home with, that doesn’t involve the recycling center.