Posts Tagged ‘fun’

{The S. Family} Eastside Family Lifestyle Photography

November 19th, 2014

I had such a fun time documenting this family last week. They wanted to take advantage of some of the beautiful scenery we have around our area, and also incorporate their new puppy into the family pictures as well. Oh, and their new seven month old puppy is a Great Dane, who I’m pretty sure […]

 

I had such a fun time documenting this family last week. They wanted to take advantage of some of the beautiful scenery we have around our area, and also incorporate their new puppy into the family pictures as well. Oh, and their new seven month old puppy is a Great Dane, who I’m pretty sure is almost as big as me. 🙂 I had a great time following the family around, running myself ragged while boy chased dog and vice versa, and also just capturing the family interaction. They were also super great in posing in fun and creative ways to bring out their personalities! I hope the pictures convey what a loving and great family they were, and how much they love each other and the outdoors.

 

Hello, Washington State!

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Look at this kid, so handsome and smiley!

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I’m not sure what I love more, the kid’s laugh in this picture, or the puppy’s smile, or the size of the stick the pup’s holding.

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Boy, in portrait, and caught mid-run in sillouette.

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What a handsome family I found in the forest.

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Most of the time, we just hung around the park.

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This was the most playful family, I just had the best time following them around and capturing them interacting with each other.

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We’re lucky to live in an area where we have such amazing natural backdrops, such as these gorgeous evergreen trees.

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Turning around, we have stunning mountains such as Mt. Rainier in the Cascades overlooking Lake Washington, as well.

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Playful, fun, gorgeous and goofy, all rolled up into one picture! 🙂

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{P is for Peacock} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

August 29th, 2013

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. […]

 

My youngest is starting kindergarten soon (when did this happen?). To help prepare him, I was looking through my old pictures to when his brother was starting kindergarten, and ran across these pictures of peacock fingerpainting. Look at how little they are, I believe they are five and two here, and having so much fun. This was a simple craft, with a little more supervision needed by the toddler (he was much more prone to fingerpaint himself. Part of the painting process, I believe). The end result is beautiful, and so pretty! I hope you enjoy our P is for Peacock picture craft.

What You’ll Need:

  • large sheets of paper (I used a roll of green paper that covered our whole table, then cut out the pictures to size. This was much easier than having them paint to a sheet of smaller paper.)
  • finger paint (Crayola makes a great finger paint that is washable)
  • **alternative** tempera paint (we use this brand also by Crayola that is washable)
  • paper plates big enough for your kids to place their hands in for the paint
  • **optional** paintbrushes (for younger kids, you may want to paint their hands)
  • nearby rags or baby wipes 🙂

 

To Make the Peacock:

  • green handprints for the tail feathers
  • red and yellow thumb prints for “eyes” on the tail feathers
  • blue fist prints for the head and body **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red or yellow thumb print for the beak **alternatively, you can paint with a brush**
  • red streaks for the legs, with thumb prints for the feet

P is for Precision. My oldest carefully placing thumbprint “eyes” on his peacock tail.

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P is for Painting. My youngest is two here, and really loved this craft. We helped him paint the peacock body, but he went to town with the handprints for the peacock body.

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P is for Passion.  He *really* got into the painting process.

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P is for Play. Fun and games, and they get some learning in the process as well.

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P is for Peacock. The finished peacock made by my oldest. We framed it and gave it to the grandparents as a gift. He was super proud he made it himself.

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P is for Picture. The finished peacock made by youngest. Not as detailed, but he was also very proud of his finished art piece!

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And in the end,  P is for Pleased and Happy boys!

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{Wordless Wednesday} Seattle Area Child Photographer

August 21st, 2013

        This post is shared with:   Sakura Haruka The Jenny Evolution

 

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{Rock Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

July 17th, 2013

If your kids are anything like mine, they like to collect things like rocks. (And sticks. Sometimes I get a surprise and it’s something that’s alive such as a worm or beetle. Or baby spiders, although that is totally another post once I recover from the trauma). Then, when you try to tell them that […]

 

If your kids are anything like mine, they like to collect things like rocks. (And sticks. Sometimes I get a surprise and it’s something that’s alive such as a worm or beetle. Or baby spiders, although that is totally another post once I recover from the trauma). Then, when you try to tell them that their “treasures” belong outside the house, you get tears and lots and lots of wailing. Here’s a simple craft you can do to occupy them, decorate up their “treasure” rocks, plus it’s actually pretty fun. As an added bonus, I even convinced mine that the pretty rocks can stay outside and not clutter up their rooms, or be used as projectiles for sibling battles. My boys love rock painting, we do it several times a year, for all holidays, rainy day activities, or even just for fun on a sunshiney day.

What You’ll Need:

  • rocks (cleaned and dry – my kids love giving their rocks a “bath”)
  • paint (we used tempura and acrylic)
  • brushes (don’t be limited to just paint brushes. We also used pencil top erasers, toothpicks, and q-tips as “brushes”)
  • **optional** you can also use glue and glitter on your rocks as well!

 

Start off with some clean and DRY rocks

Our painting set up. I have box lids for the actual rock painting, just so there’s not accidental floor paintage

Then, get your paint. I set mine out in paper plates for my boys.

Then, let them paint!

Here’s what dot painting with a pencil end looks like as well.

Some of our finished creations.

My oldest was super proud of his Captain America shield rock.

We even glittered some rocks to make them look like real “treasures”

In rock land, Hello Kitty and Batman live side by side in peace

We painted some to look like caterpillers and bugs

And my youngest loves all things ladybugs. Happy crafting!

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{Salt Water Science} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

June 6th, 2013

One of my favorite places to get science project ideas and equipment is the Steve Spangler science website. I also sign up for their emails, which include daily deals, and awesome links to cool science videos. When  I got this email for this neat looking salt water density straw experiment, I knew that I had to […]

 

One of my favorite places to get science project ideas and equipment is the Steve Spangler science website. I also sign up for their emails, which include daily deals, and awesome links to cool science videos. When  I got this email for this neat looking salt water density straw experiment, I knew that I had to try it out with the boys. We had already done the density tower experiment with different kitchen liquids, and this experiment talked about density just using salt water. This was really fascinating for my older son as well as my younger son. I would highly recommend it for all ages, as you could tailor questions appropriate for your age demographic.

Some questions we had before we started: would the glasses with more salt, or less salt, be more dense? Is density the same thing as weight? Would the colors separate out due to their different densities, or would they mix together?

What You’ll Need:

  • Salt (table salt is fine)
  • three or four different holding containers
  • water
  • teaspoon
  • stirring stick
  • food coloring
  • CLEAR plastic straws – this was actually hard for me to find, so I went with clear straws from our sippy cups, which didn’t photograph as well.

 

I asked my older son to write a sign. He took some creative license with illustrating “salt” “water” density. 🙂

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What you’ll need – pretty simple kitchen stuff. Salt, measuring teaspoons, food coloring. I put water in the big yellow jug.

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I had the boys write out on some note cards the amount of salt they were to add into each glass beforehand. Then, they took turns adding the teaspoons of salt into each container. We went with 1, 3, 5, and 7 teaspoons of salt (plus one with no salt for a control glass).

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From L-R, a glass with 7 teaspoons of salt all the way to a glass with just 1 teaspoon of salt in it. Then, you stir to dissolve the salt. (or, as my youngest says, MORE MIXING!)

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A close up of the two. You can see the difference in the salinity, and also the opaqueness in the liquid. Very cool!

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Then the fun began. We added food coloring to the different glasses.

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Stirring, stirring, stirring. The boys got in some nice writing practice for the labels as well.

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Then, THE FUN PART! We got the different colored waters to stay separated, due to the density of their salt solutions. The boys were suitably impressed.

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We tried to do it with the straw, but since I couldn’t find any clear straws, I made do with a sippy cup straw, which did not photograph as well but you can see the colors are clearly separate due to the different densities of our salt water mixtures. My youngest did the experiment on his own at a later date, and proudly showed me how he got the two colors to stay separate. 

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We also tested which objects would sink or float in the different salt water densities. Here’s a marble and a washer in the 7 teaspoon glass.

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When it came down to it, the boys just really enjoyed color mixing, figuring out which things would float in which glass, and how to layer the different densities. Remember our questions from earlier? Density was NOT the same as being heavy, as the salt dissolved in the water and all the glasses ended up weighing the same (or thereabouts – we didn’t actually weigh them, just held them).  The glasses with MORE salt were more dense, as the salt molecules filled up the spaces inbetween the water molecules, making it more compact. And, the colors STAYED separated and didn’t mix! All in all, a very cool science project! 

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{Sandpaper Art T-Shirts} Seattle Area Childrens Photographer

May 29th, 2013

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the […]

 

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the boys, and the results were great! Not only was it incredibly easy to do, it took very little supervision from me, and the final result was  beautiful. Now the boys are super excited to design one for dad for Father’s Day! PLEASE NOTE: since you will be transferring the picture upside down from your sandpaper, the image on the T-shirt will be a mirror image of what your child drew. So, I would stay away from any words (which will get transferred on backwards), and stick to simple images.

What You’ll Need

  • sandpaper (I used both coarse 60 grit, and a finer 220 grit. coarser will get you more texture, finer will let you get more details in your drawing)
  • crayons
  • white t shirts
  • iron
  • paper towel or regular towel
  • ***IMPORTANT*** since the drawing will be placed backwards to be ironed onto the t shirt, whatever you draw will be mirrored on the t shirt. So it is best NOT to draw any words.

 

This is all you’ll need for this craft (minus the iron). The two different sandpaper is a bonus – you can get away with one type!

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 First, draw your picture onto the sandpaper. I let my youngest use the coarser grit sandpaper.

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My oldest wanted more details in his drawing, so I let him have the finer grit sandpaper.

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My youngest and his finished sandpaper drawing. He wanted to fill up his whole piece of sandpaper.

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He didn’t really believe me that it would print onto the t shirt.

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Second, place your sandpaper upside down on your t shirt, and iron on the COTTON setting (with no steam). I also placed a paper towel in between the t shirt to make sure there was no bleed through. I ironed for about 2 minutes, the coarser sandpaper took longer than the finer grit one. Just keep lifting up to check to make sure the crayon has melted onto the shirt.

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Voila! That is it, two easy steps! That is how you make a sandpaper art t shirt. To “set” your design, take a paper towel (or a cotton towel), and iron for about 20 seconds on top of your crayon design.

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A close up of my older son’s design. I love the surf boards.

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Happy, happy kids! They loved that they were able to make their own shirts, and tell people they designed it themselves. Next, we are working on a design for dad’s shirt for Father’s Day (SHHHHHH don’t tell him). Happy Crafting!

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{Wordless Wednesday} Seattle Area Child Photographer

May 7th, 2013

        This post is shared with: The Jenny Evolution

 

 

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{Bridge Building, 101} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

April 20th, 2013

Both boys are on spring break this week from preschool and elementary school respectively. Now, spring break around here is hit or miss weather wise, usually more of a miss. I came across this project idea for  building a bridge from Science Sparks (a new monthly link up they have called Challenge and Discover) and […]

 

Both boys are on spring break this week from preschool and elementary school respectively. Now, spring break around here is hit or miss weather wise, usually more of a miss. I came across this project idea for  building a bridge from Science Sparks (a new monthly link up they have called Challenge and Discover) and thought, what a GREAT project! The boys took to it quite enthusiastically, and it took up most of a morning. It definitely was one of the best science projects we’ve done. Not only did we get to draw out what we thought our bridge would look like, we got to build it out of newspaper (!!), measure and look at numbers, have a failed experiment, rethink our project, and then have a successful bridge. WOO HOO!

The guidelines to the project were: A) The bridge had to hold at least one kilogram (1kg=2.2lb) and B) the bridge had to be made out of one object in the recycle bin. Here is what we did for our project.

We used newspaper and scotch tape.

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Here is the draft that my oldest drew for what he thought the bridge would look like. I would like you to note the star shape under the bridge!

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For my preschooler, I printed out different bridges and had him circle ones he liked.

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Next, we rolled up the newspaper in order to make it sturdier, like sticks. We rolled up half sheets, then cut them in half again for the bridge supports. For the main bridge, we rolled up a whole sheet for the bridge decking.

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Our supports. I helped with this phase, I think we rolled up 12 pieces of newspaper to make 24 supports.

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The boys figuring out how to attach them together.

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My oldest went back to his drawing and decided the star design was the strongest. He went to town with the tape.

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Cutting to level the supports.

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The bridge decking, and all the leg supports.

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The preschooler was Captain Tape Giver Person

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He also measured the length and width of the bridge.

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The bridge was 32 inches long, and 6 inches wide.

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My oldest then went to taping the star shaped supports to the bridge deck.

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The bridge is finished! We did have some problems with leveling (my husband later surmised it may have been sturdier on carpet, or another more giving surface than hardwood).

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First test: EPIC FAIL!

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We decided that scotch tape was not strong enough, so we went back and reinforced the supports with duct tape. SUCCESS!

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Overall, this was a super fun and exciting project. My oldest did most of this, from drawing the bridge, to figuring out how to make it from the supports, to being sad about it not working, to suggesting the duct tape. We even made a video where he explains everything, if you want to watch. Thank you again, Science Sparks, for hosting this great event! We look forward to what’s in store for next month!

 

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{Math + Arth = FUN} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

April 9th, 2013

My preschooler loves math. He also loves arts and crafts, but everyone knows his real love is math. Most of the time, I’m able to combine the two together in a “lesson” to teach him something math related, while we’re creating something fun. Did you know that mathematics is sometimes called, the “science of patterns”? […]

 

My preschooler loves math. He also loves arts and crafts, but everyone knows his real love is math. Most of the time, I’m able to combine the two together in a “lesson” to teach him something math related, while we’re creating something fun. Did you know that mathematics is sometimes called, the “science of patterns”? Think about it!  Patterns happen everywhere, whether it’s in repeating numbers, colors, shapes, or expressions. By showing kids to look for a pattern, you’re teaching them the basics of problem solving.

For this craft, I had all these leftover little squares of construction paper. We decided that we would make a spring flower craft out of them, using different shapes. We did circles, triangles, and squares. This was a fun craft because we got to talk about shapes, patterns, AND make a cool art project at the end to show off!

What We Did:

  • for the triangles, we used two colors as petals, and laid them down in a pattern. The placement of which way the triangle went wasn’t important, the pattern of which color went next was the important part.
  • for the circles, I traced out circles from big to small, and had him cut it out. Then he glued them in descending order, biggest to smallest, learning about sizes as well.
  • For the squares, we left them the same size, and just layered them on top of each other, with an additional circle for the middle.

 

My leftover pieces of construction paper. They were perfect for this project.

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I had my preschooler cut out circles. We also cut the squares diagonally to make triangles, and finally left them as they were in order to have our three different shapes.

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He also cut and glued on some grass, and flower stems.

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For the triangle shapes, we used two different colors to make a repeating pattern. It didn’t matter the orientation of the triangle, what mattered was the COLOR PATTERN. 

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For the circles, we went from biggest, to medium, to smallest. Again, learning sizes is another math concept at work here!

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For the squares, we put them together and talked about how they made a pretty shape together, and how flowers in nature can look like that as well, like gerber daisies (which happen to be one of my favorite flowers).

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And our final product! Circles, triangles, and squares all working together to make a beautiful flower art craft. In the meantime, it also taught my preschooler some patterns, shape and sizes recognition, and how nature also uses math. So go forth, have fun, and mix math and art together!

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{Secret Agent Party} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

April 5th, 2013

Recently, my oldest was invited to this SUPER AWESOME Secret Agent themed birthday party. Since my boys are All About Spies, this was pretty much the greatest thing ever to happen in their lives. I think my youngest may have taken it a mite too seriously. I don’t think I saw a smile on his […]

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Recently, my oldest was invited to this SUPER AWESOME Secret Agent themed birthday party. Since my boys are All About Spies, this was pretty much the greatest thing ever to happen in their lives. I think my youngest may have taken it a mite too seriously. I don’t think I saw a smile on his face the entire time. Because, you know, Secret Agent Spies never smile. First, they had to have a password to enter the party. Next, they got to make their Secret Identity Card. Then, there were the Secret Agent Disguises. They even got to have their fingerprints taken. Next, they got “Secret Agent bags” which contained a crayon, a decoder wheel, a magnifying glass, and some other spy paraphernalia. Then, Secret Agent “D” led the boys on an obstacle course. There were clues to decode, balloon “bombs” to burst, juice to help you decode, and finally, an infrared “laser” field to get to the goodie bags! Overall, it was a smashing success and very, very fun!

I have to give major props to Mom (Secret Agent “M”) and Dad (Secret Agent “D”) of the birthday boy. They were 100% involved and led the boys all around in all the “secret missions”, not to mention setting up all the obstacles beforehand. Without them, the party couldn’t have gone off without a hitch!

 

Ordinary boys, ready to turn into Secret Agent Hawkeye and Secret Agent Flash. They even needed a secret password to get into the door! (provided by Agent “M” and Agent “D” prior to the party)

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Arriving inside Headquarters

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The laser field was blocked off with caution tape for the unwary.

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Secret Agent Disguises

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Agents, ready for their secret mission!

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Working on their identification badges with Secret Agent “M”

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What the badges look liked, aren’t they cool? My boys LOVED these.

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Hanging out with some other agents.

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Who are those cool spies?

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Awesome and tasty cake.

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Secret Agent “D” helping to take fingerprints.

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Yes, he did fingerprint that entire line of kids! Big kudos to him.

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The boys were just cracking me up with their spy antics.

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Getting ready for their secret mission.

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Finding the first clue.

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Their Secret Agent bags with their decoders, and what the clues looked like that they were finding.

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Hard at work. The papers had the list of where all the clues were listed.

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There was a clue where they “painted” this decoder juice onto it to reveal the secret message.

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Are you REALLY a secret agent?

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Another mission!
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This part was hilarious for me, some of the “bombs” were a smidge harder to burst than the others. There was a lot of giggling involved.

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Last obstacle to overcome!

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Goofing off after the mission.

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I noticed that my water tasted sort of funny…

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The birthday boy (and sneak attack by Secret Agent Little Brother!)

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My favorite picture of the day.

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Birthday Boy and his momma.

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Happy Birthday, Secret Agent!
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