Posts Tagged ‘father’s day’

{Sandpaper Art T-Shirts} Seattle Area Childrens Photographer

May 29th, 2013

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the […]

 

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the boys, and the results were great! Not only was it incredibly easy to do, it took very little supervision from me, and the final result was  beautiful. Now the boys are super excited to design one for dad for Father’s Day! PLEASE NOTE: since you will be transferring the picture upside down from your sandpaper, the image on the T-shirt will be a mirror image of what your child drew. So, I would stay away from any words (which will get transferred on backwards), and stick to simple images.

What You’ll Need

  • sandpaper (I used both coarse 60 grit, and a finer 220 grit. coarser will get you more texture, finer will let you get more details in your drawing)
  • crayons
  • white t shirts
  • iron
  • paper towel or regular towel
  • ***IMPORTANT*** since the drawing will be placed backwards to be ironed onto the t shirt, whatever you draw will be mirrored on the t shirt. So it is best NOT to draw any words.

 

This is all you’ll need for this craft (minus the iron). The two different sandpaper is a bonus – you can get away with one type!

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 First, draw your picture onto the sandpaper. I let my youngest use the coarser grit sandpaper.

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My oldest wanted more details in his drawing, so I let him have the finer grit sandpaper.

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My youngest and his finished sandpaper drawing. He wanted to fill up his whole piece of sandpaper.

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He didn’t really believe me that it would print onto the t shirt.

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Second, place your sandpaper upside down on your t shirt, and iron on the COTTON setting (with no steam). I also placed a paper towel in between the t shirt to make sure there was no bleed through. I ironed for about 2 minutes, the coarser sandpaper took longer than the finer grit one. Just keep lifting up to check to make sure the crayon has melted onto the shirt.

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Voila! That is it, two easy steps! That is how you make a sandpaper art t shirt. To “set” your design, take a paper towel (or a cotton towel), and iron for about 20 seconds on top of your crayon design.

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A close up of my older son’s design. I love the surf boards.

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Happy, happy kids! They loved that they were able to make their own shirts, and tell people they designed it themselves. Next, we are working on a design for dad’s shirt for Father’s Day (SHHHHHH don’t tell him). Happy Crafting!

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{Spin Art} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 24th, 2013

In the summer, one of the things my kids love to do is go to the state fair. There, besides the carnival rides and gorging on cotton candy, they love doing the Spin Art. I dutifully bought one of the Spin Art machines, only to find that a) paint got EVERYWHERE,  b) my younger son […]

 

In the summer, one of the things my kids love to do is go to the state fair. There, besides the carnival rides and gorging on cotton candy, they love doing the Spin Art. I dutifully bought one of the Spin Art machines, only to find that a) paint got EVERYWHERE,  b) my younger son couldn’t really use it without major, MAJOR supervision and c) the machine broke easily with enthusiastic usage. When I found this method of “spin art” online, I was pleased as punch to try to put it in action. All I needed was a salad spinner, which I sent my husband to look for at a thrift store. It worked beautifully, the paint mess was contained, and my preschooler-aged son LOVED the process. As some added side bonuses, we got to learn about some color mixing when we had some primary colors blend together in the salad spinner, we got to talk about centrifugal (or spinning) force, and we started on some cool Father’s Day cards. I would highly recommend this craft for toddlers on up to elementary aged kids as well!

What You’ll Need:

  • Salad Spinner (we got ours at the thrift shop for $2.50!)
  • paint (use a variety! we used both watercolors, tempura, and acrylics to see which “spins” the best)
  • paper (a heavier paper, like a watercolor paper, is better because it didn’t fly up during the spinning process. If you use regular sheet paper, I would tape two together to make it heavier).
  • experiment with your paper shapes inside the spinner. we cut out both squares and circles. I liked the look of the squares, but my son and both agreed the circles ended up looking the coolest.

 

Stick the paper inside the bottom of the spinner, then have your kiddo sploosh some paint on the inside.  This was acrylic paint. I let my preschooler choose whatever color combinations he wanted to pick.

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Set the top, and spin! This was my preschooler’s FAVORITE part. I cannot stress enough how much he enjoyed the pumping of the spinning top. We have another salad spinner which has a rotating spinner, but the pumping spinner was the hands down winner.

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Pretty! The acrylic paint was heavier, and didn’t “spin” as far as we thought it would.

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Here is where we experimented with watercolors, and round paper. I love how the black and white mixed to form grey. We did some other color mixing as well, and it turned into an impromptu color mixing lesson. I think the one on the right looks like the earth.

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This one is my favorite. I love how it looks almost like a flower pattern. We made quite a few more, and are going to use it to make cards for Father’s Day. Next time, we’re going to try to figure out how to add paint while it is actually spinning. Overall, this was a fun craft, and when my older son came home he immediately wanted to do his own “spin art” as well. Four thumbs up!

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