Posts Tagged ‘elementary school’

{Weather Making Science} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

June 20th, 2013

One of the nifty things about living in the Seattle area is that in the month of June, they host a Seattle Science Festival. Last year was the first one, and this year was the second one. One of the fun things we were able to do was attend the NOAA open house here in […]

 

One of the nifty things about living in the Seattle area is that in the month of June, they host a Seattle Science Festival. Last year was the first one, and this year was the second one. One of the fun things we were able to do was attend the NOAA open house here in Seattle last Friday, and my boys and I were entranced by all the things we learned. The NOAA stands for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which means that it studies the oceans, marine animals, and also the weather. The boys and I got to do some interesting experiments on weather modelling and predictions, and when we got home, my youngest asked if we could do some more weather experiments. I looked things up, and found we could make a tornado in a bottle, make rain, and make fog. Sounds like fun!

What You’ll Need To Make Rain or Fog:

  • Jars or Tall glasses (preferrable with wide mouths. I use mason jars)
  • hot water
  • ice cubes
  • strainer
  • plastic plate

 

Here was our set up to make rain. I put hot water in the jar, put the plastic plate on top of the jar, then put ice cubes on top and waited about ten minutes. TO MAKE FOG: the set up is the same, except that instead of a plate on top, you put your ice cubes in a strainer, and only put about an inch of hot water in the glass (fog was too hard to capture on camera, hence no pictures)

weatherscience2

 

You can see the precipitation forming on the underside of the plate. There will be condensation on the inside of the jar as well, and if you’re patient, you’ll see the “rain” actually come down. HOW IT WORKS: What happens is that the warm air from the hot water collides with the cold air from the ice cubes. For rain, enough water particles will bond together to become heavy enough to become rain drops. For fog, the warm air and cold air mix nearer the ground, thus creating mist. Pretty cool!

weatherscience1

 

What You’ll Need to Make A Bottle Tornado:

  • Two 2-litre bottles
  • water
  • duct tape
  • washer
  • **optional** colored lamp oil (found at craft stores or hardware stores)
  • **optional** a tornado tube. I would TOTALLY RECOMMEND getting one of these

 

Here is the set up for making a bottle tornado. You want to fill up one of the bottles 2/3 full with water (cold or room temp tap water is fine).

tornado5

 

This is what a tornado tube looks like. It is a plastic tube that you can screw both ends of your 2 litre bottles into, with little leaks.  I got mine at our local toy store for $1.99.

tornado6

 

You don’t need to use lamp oil, but if you do, about 1/4 cup is enough. It just makes the tornado colorful. You can also put in light “debris” such as styrofoam bits, or legos, or use dish washing soap to make a “bubbly” tornado. We chose a red tornado, and used a funnel to put it inside the 2 litre bottle.

tornado2

 

If you don’t use a tornado tube, you’ll need to put the washer on top of the bottome 2 litre bottle.

tornado3

 

Then, put the empty 2 litre bottle on top of the washer. Make sure it lines up.

tornado8

 

Duct tape the two bottles together, and swirl in a circular motion to make centrifugal force to create your tornado.

tornado7

 

TORNADO! if you don’t add colored oil, your tornado will still be impressive looking, such as our tornado on the right. **BE WARNED** if you use the washer/duct tape method, after a few tornadoes your duct tape becomes gummy and the bottles fall apart and you will have to re-tape. This is why I recommend the tornado tube if you want to do the experiment more than once.

tornado4

 

We brought our bottle tornado to my oldest son’s end of year school picnic, and it was a big hit. The kids got to make a dancing tornado.

tornado1

 

And there you have it, tornado in a bottle!

tornado9

 

 

DID YOU KNOW? After our experimentation, my older son asked what was the biggest raindrop ever recorded. We had to look it up, and found out some really interesting facts about raindrops!

  • raindrops are on average .1mm to .2mm big
  • the biggest a raindrop usually occurs in nature is .5mm
  • the biggest recorded raindrop was between .6mm or .8mm
  • raindrops bigger than .2mm are not “tear drop” shaped, but rather “hamburger” shaped. the force of falling often will split the “hamburger” shape raindrop into two

We also learned some facts about tornadoes:

  • tornadoes in water are called waterspouts
  • In the southern hemisphere tornadoes usually rotate in a clockwise direction.
  • In the northern hemisphere tornadoes usually rotate in a counterclockwise direction.
  • tornado wind speeds usually are under 100 mph, but can reach over 300 mph!

Lasso the Moon

this post is shared at:

Science Sunday at Adventures in Mommmydom

Monday Kid Corner Roundup

 

breaker

{Salt Water Science} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

June 6th, 2013

One of my favorite places to get science project ideas and equipment is the Steve Spangler science website. I also sign up for their emails, which include daily deals, and awesome links to cool science videos. When  I got this email for this neat looking salt water density straw experiment, I knew that I had to […]

 

One of my favorite places to get science project ideas and equipment is the Steve Spangler science website. I also sign up for their emails, which include daily deals, and awesome links to cool science videos. When  I got this email for this neat looking salt water density straw experiment, I knew that I had to try it out with the boys. We had already done the density tower experiment with different kitchen liquids, and this experiment talked about density just using salt water. This was really fascinating for my older son as well as my younger son. I would highly recommend it for all ages, as you could tailor questions appropriate for your age demographic.

Some questions we had before we started: would the glasses with more salt, or less salt, be more dense? Is density the same thing as weight? Would the colors separate out due to their different densities, or would they mix together?

What You’ll Need:

  • Salt (table salt is fine)
  • three or four different holding containers
  • water
  • teaspoon
  • stirring stick
  • food coloring
  • CLEAR plastic straws – this was actually hard for me to find, so I went with clear straws from our sippy cups, which didn’t photograph as well.

 

I asked my older son to write a sign. He took some creative license with illustrating “salt” “water” density. 🙂

saltdensitysb1

 

What you’ll need – pretty simple kitchen stuff. Salt, measuring teaspoons, food coloring. I put water in the big yellow jug.

saltdensity3

 

I had the boys write out on some note cards the amount of salt they were to add into each glass beforehand. Then, they took turns adding the teaspoons of salt into each container. We went with 1, 3, 5, and 7 teaspoons of salt (plus one with no salt for a control glass).

saltdensity4

 

From L-R, a glass with 7 teaspoons of salt all the way to a glass with just 1 teaspoon of salt in it. Then, you stir to dissolve the salt. (or, as my youngest says, MORE MIXING!)

saltdensitysb4

 

A close up of the two. You can see the difference in the salinity, and also the opaqueness in the liquid. Very cool!

saltdensitysb3

 

Then the fun began. We added food coloring to the different glasses.

saltdensitysb2

 

Stirring, stirring, stirring. The boys got in some nice writing practice for the labels as well.

saltdensity5

 

Then, THE FUN PART! We got the different colored waters to stay separated, due to the density of their salt solutions. The boys were suitably impressed.

saltdensity1

 

We tried to do it with the straw, but since I couldn’t find any clear straws, I made do with a sippy cup straw, which did not photograph as well but you can see the colors are clearly separate due to the different densities of our salt water mixtures. My youngest did the experiment on his own at a later date, and proudly showed me how he got the two colors to stay separate. 

saltdensitysb6

 

We also tested which objects would sink or float in the different salt water densities. Here’s a marble and a washer in the 7 teaspoon glass.

saltdensitysb5

 

When it came down to it, the boys just really enjoyed color mixing, figuring out which things would float in which glass, and how to layer the different densities. Remember our questions from earlier? Density was NOT the same as being heavy, as the salt dissolved in the water and all the glasses ended up weighing the same (or thereabouts – we didn’t actually weigh them, just held them).  The glasses with MORE salt were more dense, as the salt molecules filled up the spaces inbetween the water molecules, making it more compact. And, the colors STAYED separated and didn’t mix! All in all, a very cool science project! 

saltdensity2
This post is shared with:

Science Sunday at Adventures in Mommydom

Fun Sparks – May at Science Sparks
Lasso the Moon

breaker

{Sandpaper Art T-Shirts} Seattle Area Childrens Photographer

May 29th, 2013

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the […]

 

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the boys, and the results were great! Not only was it incredibly easy to do, it took very little supervision from me, and the final result was  beautiful. Now the boys are super excited to design one for dad for Father’s Day! PLEASE NOTE: since you will be transferring the picture upside down from your sandpaper, the image on the T-shirt will be a mirror image of what your child drew. So, I would stay away from any words (which will get transferred on backwards), and stick to simple images.

What You’ll Need

  • sandpaper (I used both coarse 60 grit, and a finer 220 grit. coarser will get you more texture, finer will let you get more details in your drawing)
  • crayons
  • white t shirts
  • iron
  • paper towel or regular towel
  • ***IMPORTANT*** since the drawing will be placed backwards to be ironed onto the t shirt, whatever you draw will be mirrored on the t shirt. So it is best NOT to draw any words.

 

This is all you’ll need for this craft (minus the iron). The two different sandpaper is a bonus – you can get away with one type!

sandpapertshirt3

 

 First, draw your picture onto the sandpaper. I let my youngest use the coarser grit sandpaper.

sandpapertshirt4

 

My oldest wanted more details in his drawing, so I let him have the finer grit sandpaper.

sandpapertshirt1

 

My youngest and his finished sandpaper drawing. He wanted to fill up his whole piece of sandpaper.

sandpapertshirt8

 

He didn’t really believe me that it would print onto the t shirt.

sandpapertshirt5

 

Second, place your sandpaper upside down on your t shirt, and iron on the COTTON setting (with no steam). I also placed a paper towel in between the t shirt to make sure there was no bleed through. I ironed for about 2 minutes, the coarser sandpaper took longer than the finer grit one. Just keep lifting up to check to make sure the crayon has melted onto the shirt.

sandpapertshirt9

 

Voila! That is it, two easy steps! That is how you make a sandpaper art t shirt. To “set” your design, take a paper towel (or a cotton towel), and iron for about 20 seconds on top of your crayon design.

sandpapertshirt2

 

A close up of my older son’s design. I love the surf boards.

sandpapertshirt7

 

Happy, happy kids! They loved that they were able to make their own shirts, and tell people they designed it themselves. Next, we are working on a design for dad’s shirt for Father’s Day (SHHHHHH don’t tell him). Happy Crafting!

sandpapertshirt6

 

This post is shared with:

Lasso the Moon

 

Monday Kid Corner Round Up

Making The World Cuter

Craftastic Mondays

Made By You Mondays

Mad Skills Party

It’s Party Time

Get Your Craft On

Tutorial Tuesday

We Did It Wednesday

Wow Me Wednesday

Whatever Goes Wednesday

Create Share Post

Whatever You Want Wednesday

Rock N Share

Share Your Creations

Made By Me

Blog Stalking Thursday

Catch A Glimpse

Inspiration Gallery

Friday Flash Blog

Weekend Wander

Flaunt It Friday

Weekend Wander – While He Was Napping

Anything Goes

BFF Linky Party

The Weekly Creative

breaker

{Math + Arth = FUN} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

April 9th, 2013

My preschooler loves math. He also loves arts and crafts, but everyone knows his real love is math. Most of the time, I’m able to combine the two together in a “lesson” to teach him something math related, while we’re creating something fun. Did you know that mathematics is sometimes called, the “science of patterns”? […]

 

My preschooler loves math. He also loves arts and crafts, but everyone knows his real love is math. Most of the time, I’m able to combine the two together in a “lesson” to teach him something math related, while we’re creating something fun. Did you know that mathematics is sometimes called, the “science of patterns”? Think about it!  Patterns happen everywhere, whether it’s in repeating numbers, colors, shapes, or expressions. By showing kids to look for a pattern, you’re teaching them the basics of problem solving.

For this craft, I had all these leftover little squares of construction paper. We decided that we would make a spring flower craft out of them, using different shapes. We did circles, triangles, and squares. This was a fun craft because we got to talk about shapes, patterns, AND make a cool art project at the end to show off!

What We Did:

  • for the triangles, we used two colors as petals, and laid them down in a pattern. The placement of which way the triangle went wasn’t important, the pattern of which color went next was the important part.
  • for the circles, I traced out circles from big to small, and had him cut it out. Then he glued them in descending order, biggest to smallest, learning about sizes as well.
  • For the squares, we left them the same size, and just layered them on top of each other, with an additional circle for the middle.

 

My leftover pieces of construction paper. They were perfect for this project.

20130404SB1

 

I had my preschooler cut out circles. We also cut the squares diagonally to make triangles, and finally left them as they were in order to have our three different shapes.

20130403_009smallWM

 

He also cut and glued on some grass, and flower stems.

20130403_012smallWM

 

For the triangle shapes, we used two different colors to make a repeating pattern. It didn’t matter the orientation of the triangle, what mattered was the COLOR PATTERN. 

20130404SB2

 

For the circles, we went from biggest, to medium, to smallest. Again, learning sizes is another math concept at work here!

20130404SB3

 

For the squares, we put them together and talked about how they made a pretty shape together, and how flowers in nature can look like that as well, like gerber daisies (which happen to be one of my favorite flowers).

gerber daisy

 

And our final product! Circles, triangles, and squares all working together to make a beautiful flower art craft. In the meantime, it also taught my preschooler some patterns, shape and sizes recognition, and how nature also uses math. So go forth, have fun, and mix math and art together!

20130404SB4
Lasso the Moon

Inspiration Laboratories

breaker

{Ivory Soap Science Experiment} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

February 20th, 2012

It’s monday and not sunday, but I’m still going to call it the sunday science post. I found this cool (and easy!) experiment titled “What Happens When You Microwave Ivory Soap” . I thought, how different could Ivory soap be from other soaps? It was a super fun, easy, clean!, and also preschooler friendly experiment. Here […]

 

It’s monday and not sunday, but I’m still going to call it the sunday science post. I found this cool (and easy!) experiment titled “What Happens When You Microwave Ivory Soap” . I thought, how different could Ivory soap be from other soaps? It was a super fun, easy, clean!, and also preschooler friendly experiment. Here is what we did.

 

You Need:

  • bar of Ivory soap, quartered. IMPORTANT one of the soaps needs to be Ivory
  • bar of some other soap, quartered
  • microwave (put soap in for 30 seconds at a time)
  • microwave safe dish (we used paper plates)
  • big bowl of water (optional – for playing with the soap)

 

Our Hypothesis: What Happens When You Microwave Ivory Soap?  (This was before we had the cool chalkboards to write stuff down)

Six Year Old: it doesn’t do anything

Three Year Old: it becomes tasty? (heh, he cracks me up)

We started with the Ivory soap

We also used Lever 2000 as our secondary control

We broke the soap in half to see what it looked like inside

The Lever 2000 after we microwaved for 60 seconds

Aannnnnnnnnnnnd…here is what Ivory soap looks like after being microwaved for 60 seconds!

Another before and after shot of the Lever 2000

And a before and after of the Ivory soap

 

CONCLUSION: Ivory soap blows up in the microwave, where the other soap did not.

WHY: Ivory soap is made up of whipped air! When you microwave it, the air expands into the surrounding solid state soap, thus making it “blow up” , aka turn into soap foam.

 

Other cool things to try with Ivory Soap vs. Other Soap:

  • Place a bar of Ivory and your Other Soap in a bowl of water. Does it float? Does it sink?
  • Cut or break off a piece of Ivory and your Other Soap and examine it. Do you see pockets of air? (if you cut non-Ivory soap, make sure you have a strong hand because it will be harder to cut)
  • HAVE FUN!