Posts Tagged ‘crafts’

{Garden Plant Markers} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

March 28th, 2013

Here in the Seattle area, it’s definitely SPRING! And with spring, comes the annual spring planting. My kids love gardening as much as I do, and one of our favorite projects we did last year was making plant markers for the garden. This was a relatively inexpensive project that was easy, FUN, and totally engaging […]

 

Here in the Seattle area, it’s definitely SPRING! And with spring, comes the annual spring planting. My kids love gardening as much as I do, and one of our favorite projects we did last year was making plant markers for the garden. This was a relatively inexpensive project that was easy, FUN, and totally engaging for both my boys. As a bonus, they love their little works of art all around the yard, and proudly show them off to everyone who comes along and asks.

 What You’ll Need:

  • Canning Lids (I used both wide mouth, and regular size)
  • paint (I used acrylic to withstand the weather outside. I do not think tempura would be a good choice)
  • bamboo skewers (to use for the posts)
  • glue (I used my trust E6000, but you can also just use a hot glue gun)
  • Sharpie Paint Pens (I used this to write the names of all the produce)

 

We start off with our “canvas”, aka the canning jar lids.

20120416_005small

 

I set up my boys outside. First, we painted all the lids white. In hindsight, I would not do this step again as they just painted over the whole thing anyway. But, it made for a nice, clean looking backdrop. Then, I set them up with acrylic paints on paper plates, paintbrushes, pencils (to use as dobbers) and let them go to town. They each got a mix of big and little canning lids to paint.

gardenSB1

 

Good thing acrylic paint is washable. My youngest was more prone to paint himself.

20120416_018small

 

This was a Very Serious Project.

gardenSB2

 

Finished! I loved how creative and free form their paintings were, and I was really looking forward to the little works of art to put in the garden. 

20120416_029small

 

Some of their favorites they asked to photograph. Red poppy, rainbow, sun, treehouse (red blobby thing in the bottom left corner)

20120416_021small

 

Overnight, I let the lids dry. then, I glued the bamboo skewers onto the back, and wrote the names of whatever we were planting on the front with the Sharpie paint pen.

20120417_004small

 

He was very excited to go put them in the garden!

20120417_001small

 

A close up of what they looked like in the ground.

gardenSB3

 

And our herb garden. Overall, a very satisfying project! My kids love showing off their works of art, and as a bonus, now my husband knows where to find everything when I send him to snip me some herbs for dinner. 🙂

20120417_011small

This post is shared with:

Lasso the Moon

Made By You Mondays

Monday Fundays by C.R.A.F.T

Motive Me Mondays

 It’s Party Time! (It’s So Very Cheri)

 Mad Craft Skills Party

 Get Your Craft On!

 Teach Me Stuff! (Hope Studios)

 What’s It Wednesday

We Did It Wednesday

Wicked Awesome Wednesday

Wow Me Wednesday

breaker

{Science Sunday – Making SLIME!} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

March 10th, 2013

At my younger son’s preschool, we have two sensory bins, one “wet” and one “dry”. This week, in the “wet” sensory bin, the parent in charge had made a huge supply of gak (aka SLIME!). My four year old had so much fun with it, we decided to try it out at home. Basically, “gak” […]

 

At my younger son’s preschool, we have two sensory bins, one “wet” and one “dry”. This week, in the “wet” sensory bin, the parent in charge had made a huge supply of gak (aka SLIME!). My four year old had so much fun with it, we decided to try it out at home. Basically, “gak” is a long polymer, or a long strand of connecting molecules. For older (and younger) kids, you can take this lesson a step further by cooking up some spaghetti. Fresh cooked spaghetti slithers and slides all over each other, you can show your children that they are acting like long molecules, or polymers as well. After a while, the spaghetti starts sticking together, and if you’re brave, you can squish it and make it bounce on the floor (just like gak!).  In real life, polymers that slide (like wet cooked spaghetti) are more liquid, whereas polymers that stick and bounce (like drier cooked spaghetti) are called elastomers and are used in things like rubber! For the preschool set though, this was purely a sensory and fun science activity in showing how two things combined together would make something called “gak”.

What You’ll Need:

  • 1 teaspoon Borax (you can find it in the laundry aisle)
  • Elmer’s school glue, 8oz bottle
  • 1/2 cup warmish water
  • food coloring **optional**
  • mixing bowl
  • freezer bag or tupperware (you’ll want someplace to store the awesome gak when you’re done!)

Here are all the ingredients you will need. Easy enough, eh?

20130228_006smallWM

 

Pour all the glue into your bowl. Once it is empty, fill the empty glue bottle  with warm water, put the cap back on, shake to get all the glue bits loose, and pour it out again into the bowl. This is also a good step to add in any food coloring (we chose blue).

20130228_008smallWM

 

My four year old was checking to make sure the glue bottle was *really* empty.

20130228_014smallWM

 

Next, take your borax, dissolve in the 1/2 cup warm water, and stir. (it’s ok if not everything dissolved and there are some granules at the bottom, as long as most of it dissolves)

20130228_015smallWM

 

 Then, add the borax mixture to the glue in your bowl. You should instantly be able to see the mixture bond together to form long molecules. My four year old looks properly impressed and surprised. (He was skeptical about this experiment only having two ingredients)

20130228sb2

 

Keep mixing, and eventually you’ll end up with a big, flexible ball of gak.

20130228sb3

 

Pancake gak!

20130228sb4

 

We had gak races, taking a glob each and seeing who could make the longest strand before theirs broke (my four year old always won, coincidence?)

20130228sb1

 

When my seven year old came home from school, he immediately wanted to play in the gak as well. We involved hands AND feet. The best part was the super big smiles all around. Go forth and make your own gak today! This post heartily endorsed by my four year old.

20130228sb5
This post is shared at:

Adventures in Mommydom

Science Sparks

Lasso the Moon

breaker

{Heart Stick Arrows} Seattle Area Child Photographer

February 6th, 2013

Often, it can be challenging finding crafts that will withstand brother battle attacks, cardboard box forts, and just plain old fun. When I found this link for these arrows of love, I was quite intrigued. (be forewarned that the Krokotak site is in Bulgarian, but it’s a goldmine of interesting and FUN crafts!). Plus, it […]

 

Often, it can be challenging finding crafts that will withstand brother battle attacks, cardboard box forts, and just plain old fun. When I found this link for these arrows of love, I was quite intrigued. (be forewarned that the Krokotak site is in Bulgarian, but it’s a goldmine of interesting and FUN crafts!). Plus, it is a very simple craft. All I used were sticks from the yard, craft glue, and felt. The original site called for yarn as well, but since i didn’t have any on hand, I just cut up longer strips of leftover felt to tie on the ends of the arrows. Did I mention this craft is 1) SIMPLE , 2) HARDY and 3) FUN. What more can you ask?

What You’ll Need:

  • Sticks (we got both long and short, fat and skinny sticks)
  • Felt
  • Craft Glue (I used Aleene Tacky Glue)
  • Yarn (optional)

 

First, gather up your four year old. I mean, gather up some sticks. Cheesy four year old is optional.

20130201_013smallWM

 

Next, cut out some felt hearts.  I found it was best to cut out hearts that had a deep V in the middle. You’ll need two for each side. (this is actually my older son. I just wanted to give him a shout out. 🙂

20130202_002smallWM

 

Put down one felt heart, some glue, then your stick. You want to glue your stick on the rounded side of the heart, away from the pointy end.

20130202_003smallWM

 

Next, put more glue on the side of the stick and on top of the stick (if you really like glueing, feel free to put it all around. My kids are glue minimalists though.) Then, put the matching heart on top and leave to dry for a few hours.

20130202_004smallWM

 

I cut strips of felt and tied it to the other end of the stick to make the arrow “fletching”. EASY PEASY LEMON SQUEEZY.

20130202_005smallWM

 

Voila! Heart stick arrows. These were made with our “big” branches.

20130206_009smallWM

 

How cute are they? Yes, we definitely could have used more glue, but they have been holding up with over a week of play, so I think we’re good to go.

20130206sb1WM

 

Here are the ones we made from little sticks (and little hearts). I think we’re going to put these on strings with Valentines attached and give them to our neighbors. Aren’ they adorable?

20130206sb2WM

 

My little one loves them as well. My boys and I give this craft six thumbs up! As a bonus, when you are struck with one of these cupid arrows, you fall in love. 🙂 I hope you enjoy making them as much as we did!

20130206_035smallWM

 

Lasso the Moon

breaker

{I Moustache You to Be Mine} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

January 26th, 2013

I love coming up with cute Valentines idea for my kids, when they’re in an amicable mood for a photoshoot. I had seen some really cute moustache themed Valentines stuff on Pinterest lately, mainly ones that said “I (moustache) you to be my valentine” and thought HEY! I can do that! I already had felt […]

 

I love coming up with cute Valentines idea for my kids, when they’re in an amicable mood for a photoshoot. I had seen some really cute moustache themed Valentines stuff on Pinterest lately, mainly ones that said “I (moustache) you to be my valentine” and thought HEY! I can do that! I already had felt moustaches on hand, so I cut out hearts from felt I had in the craft room, then bribed my youngest with jelly beans, and trundled off into the backyard for a quick photoshoot. Yes, there’s glitter all over his coat, and his hat is missing a pom pom, but his smile is contagious, and I think the pictures came out pretty cute.

 

Do you know this face? I call this “four year old CHEESE” face. Maybe you’ve seen this face too, on your child.

20130115_021smallWM

 

I asked him to hold his hands over his heart. He held it over his stomach and told me, “I love my tummy more”

20130115_081smallWM

 

Sometimes, the outtakes are the best part about a photoshoot.

20130115vday2WM

 

Jon Cusack, eat your heart out. I thought about photoshopping a radio, or some rain in the photo, but thought the face and the posture said it all.

20130115_072smallWM

 

Look at this face!

20130115_037smallWM

 

I love this.

20130115_084smallWM

 

Happy Valentines Day! 

20130115vday1WM

breaker

{Fall Activity Tree} Seattle Area Childrens Photographer

September 5th, 2012

We did this last year and it was such a hit, the boys asked to do it again. Around here, autumn begins with long rainy days starting in October and doesn’t really end until June. With school holidays, snow days, days off from school due to power outages, the “activity tree” is a great way […]

 

We did this last year and it was such a hit, the boys asked to do it again. Around here, autumn begins with long rainy days starting in October and doesn’t really end until June. With school holidays, snow days, days off from school due to power outages, the “activity tree” is a great way for a frazzled parent to have some things on hand for the kids to do, or look forward to doing as a weeknight or weekend treat.

I got the original marbled leaves idea from Little Wonder Days’ blog. First, I cut out different leaf shapes (I googled “leaf shapes”  and found a bunch of great leaf outlines to print).  Definitely use cardstock or a heavier paper (I used old file folders). Regular paper will soak up too much paint and you won’t get the marblized effect. Also, I would recommend just putting the leaves on top and then lifting them, instead of dragging the leaves across. Dragging mixes the colors, and while it’s fun, you get more brownish leaves instead of the marbled leaves.

 

Shaving cream with acrylic paint on top. I let the boys swirl with a chopstick.

 

What your leaves will look like. So pretty!

 

Be sure to have some sort of water on hand, for fun mixing when you’re done with the leaf crafting.

 

If your kids are like mine, eventually after all the leaves are marblelized, they’ll start to play with the paint and shaving cream mixture themselves

 

Then you might have some kid clean up to do as well. 🙂

 

After we made all the leaves, the boys and I made a list of what type of activities we wanted to do during the fall and winter. Then we wrote one activity onto the back of each leaf.

 

Using paper grocery bags, I made a paper bag tree with branches to hang all our leaves. I used thumb tacks to secure the leaves to the wall. Last year, after we picked our activity, the boys would have the leaf “fall” to the ground. They were pretty excited about the bare tree at the end of winter!

 

Here is our list for our 2012-2013 Autumn Activity List:

  • make a spaghetti and marshmallow building
  • have a sleep-over in the tree house
  • go bowling
  • make a train city and take over the house
  • have an unbirthday party
  • have a rain party (I’m not quite sure what this entails, but my youngest came up with this so we wrote it down)
  • make s’mores for dinner
  • go camping (with the tent) in the family room
  • kids get to be the parents for a morning, while the parents get to be the kids (big hit last year, requested again this year)
  • make cookies
  • go on a scavenger hunt
  • write and mail letters to family
  • make our own movie
  • visit a farm
  • have an egg hunt
  • put on a puppet show
  • go on a hike
  • do Dad’s electric train set
  • do a leaf nature book
  • shadow puppet show
  • make a blanket fort
  • family board game night
  • pretend to be pirates for a day, even when we leave the house
  • make a time capsule
  • have a dress up parade

 

Have fun and ENJOY! The more input your children get, the more excitement you’ll see them generate, and the more creativity they’ll get flowing. Plus, there are just bonus points if it’s something you can direct them to do and it lets you have a few more moments of peace and stillness during the long winter’s day. 🙂

Lasso the Moon

breaker

{Fun boy shirts!} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

August 2nd, 2012

It’s been a while since a blog post! Being the mom of two boys, it’s been difficult finding clothes that aren’t covered in construction trucks, puppies, or sports paraphenalia. Not that there is anything wrong with trucks, puppies, or sports, but when it’s on EVERYTHING and your kid wants something different, it does make shopping […]

 

It’s been a while since a blog post! Being the mom of two boys, it’s been difficult finding clothes that aren’t covered in construction trucks, puppies, or sports paraphenalia. Not that there is anything wrong with trucks, puppies, or sports, but when it’s on EVERYTHING and your kid wants something different, it does make shopping difficult. To acquiese to my boys’ need for “cool” shirts, I looked up ways to easily spruce up a simple plain t-shirt. I settled on felt appliques done with iron on transfers, and it seemed the easiest for me, plus it conformed with the boys’ desire for “cool shirt designs”. I started with some simple shapes and did two Star Wars themed shirts (Darth Vader and Yoda) which came out great. Here’s the step by step process I used!

 

My oldest gave approval of this Darth Vader shirt.

 

I made a Star Wars Yoda shirt for my youngest.

 

 Here is the walk-thru for how I made a Lego Ninjago shirt for my kids. I googled online for a picture, something with simple lines and shapes that could easily be cut apart. This is for the character of Sensei Wu.

 

I cut apart the paper image into pieces, usually by the different colors I would use on the final product.

 

 I cut out the felt pieces and rearrange to see what it would look like altogether.

I pinned all the cut pieces to the shirt I wanted to use to see how it would look.

 

I was going to applique the pieces on the shirt afterwards, so i used Heat n Bond Lite to adhere the felt pieces onto my fabric. For those of you who don’t want to sew, I would suggest using either Heat N Bond (regular strength), or Wonder Under. 

 

I glued the felt pieces of Sensei Wu together, then put it on the plasticky side of the Heat N Bond transfer paper.

 

 Turn over the Heat N Bond transfer paper to the paper side, and iron it for about 30 seconds. There are directions on the transfer paper as well. Do NOT over iron! you will have a sticky mess everywhere.

 

Then, peel the backing away from your picture. Now the back of your piece (in this case, Sensei Wu) should be shiny. If not, iron it a little more.

 

Here’s the backside of Sensei Wu with all the backing pulled off.  You can see I embroidered some details on the front.

Then, I put Sensei Wu onto my shirt of choice, and ironed it on for as long as the directed stated (I think another 30 seconds), and you’re done! For added strength, I would also stitch around the edge of the applique to make sure it stays put through washes and play.

 

The finished products! Sensei Wu and Kai, the Spinjitsu master.

 

They also asked for dragon shirts. 

 

This one is my favorite, but oh my goodness, SO MANY CUTS. I’ll never pick another pictures with so many scales again.

breaker

{Starburst Mirror} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

March 17th, 2012

This is something a little different, a post not about my kids! I have always adored those large, funky sun/starburst mirrors I see in store. However, I did not adore the $200-$300 price tag that usually accompanies them. When I saw this cool DIY tutorial for a sunburst mirror from Dollar Store Crafts and also […]

 

This is something a little different, a post not about my kids! I have always adored those large, funky sun/starburst mirrors I see in store. However, I did not adore the $200-$300 price tag that usually accompanies them. When I saw this cool DIY tutorial for a sunburst mirror from Dollar Store Crafts and also this cool DIY tutorial from the Small Home Love blog and this cool DIY tutorial from Apartment Therapy, I knew that I could make one for my home.

My inspiration from Lamps Plus ($239)

Materials:

  • bamboo skewers, or small craft dowels
  • 4″ mirror (you can use any size mirror in the middle, I used a 4″ one)
  • Krylon Silver Metallic Paint – Use Krylon, we also tried Rustoleum and it was a very dull silver
  • small beveled mirrors (I got mine online from JOann’s) –  pack of 25 for $1.99
  • E6000 glue or gorilla glue. Be forewarned, if you go with gorilla glue, it does EXPAND so put that into your considerations.
  • cardboard rounds
I had the dowels, spray paint, and glue on hand. I just had to buy the mirrors so I spent less than $10 on this whole project. SCORE

First, I spray painted the dowels with the paint

Then, I cut TWO cardboard round to match my 4″ middle mirror. One for the dowels, and one for the mirror. You can cut it to match the shape of whatever size mirror you pick. I also marked it so I knew where to lay down my dowels when I glued.

 

After the dowels dried, I glued them to the cardboard round with the markings. Not pictured: I glued the mirror to the other cardboard round, then glued it on top of the dowels here. Then I laid a book on it overnight for it to dry and set.

 

I then glued all the little mirrors to the dowels. This was pretty easy, the glue set pretty quickly so I didn’t have to hold them to make sure they didn’t fall off.

 

And voila! The finished starburst mirror! I am really pleased with how it turned out. Please excuse the tape, we were figuring out the best location to put it and the tape was to make sure it wouldn’t fall off the wall.

 

And how it looks above our bed. You can just see the size of it from here – it’s also fairly lightweight. Hooray for DIY craftiness!

 

So there you have it, a fairly easy and cheap way to make a big, showy piece for your home. I leave you with two dancing boys, because I can’t have a blog post that doesn’t show off my cute kids. 🙂

This was shared at Get your Craft On! Go check it out to see all the fun crafts featured each week! For more fun link parties, go check out my Link Parties! page

breaker

{May the Force Be With You} Seattle Area Childrens Photographer

March 7th, 2012

My boys love Star Wars. For Christmas a couple of years ago, my husband kindly bought me Lego Star Wars, which I deemed safe enough for the kids to watch. Besides, LEGO!  Have you seen how cute those little LEGO figurines are of Han Solo, Obi Wan, and Yoda? Now, my kids haven’t even seen […]

 

My boys love Star Wars. For Christmas a couple of years ago, my husband kindly bought me Lego Star Wars, which I deemed safe enough for the kids to watch. Besides, LEGO!  Have you seen how cute those little LEGO figurines are of Han Solo, Obi Wan, and Yoda? Now, my kids haven’t even seen any of the Star Wars movies, but my oldest became obsessed. For his birthday, we did a Star Wars theme. I scoured the internet for days beforehand, trying to find the best ways to have a low budget yet still cool, Star Wars themed party. (For future reference, there are actually Star Wars Party Book, and a Star Wars Craft Book which I did not know about until after the party. Hopefully these links will help another hapless parent out in their party planning.). A few weeks of planning, some sleepless night, and 31 kids plus a very happy birthday boy later,  seemed to thoroughly enjoy all our hard work.

This year, we told him he had to limit the amount of people to how old he is turning.  🙂

So onto the party pictures! I included links to everything, and hopefully this can help some other parent with a Star Wars obsessed kid. **WARNING** This post is long and picture heavy!

1. The Invite

I just used evite, but I found some cute wording and the invitation stated this:

In a Galaxy Far, Far away… A boy of destiny was born. The Jedi council named him {NAME} and they knew that he was the chosen one.

In the six years that has followed his birth, he has been learning the powers of the force. Recently though, the Jedi knights have called upon young Padawan {NAME} to seek out Future Jedi.

Your presence is requested on sunday May 1st for Padawan {NAME} birthday party! The trials will begin promptly at 11:30am at the Jeidi Training Academy (aka our home). Please Advise the Jedi council as to whether you will be accepting the challenge of the trials. Future Jeidi siblings may also partake in the trials. May The Force Be With you!

 

2. The Lightsabers, aka what I used instead of giving out goody bags.

I will admit, I kind of hate goody bags. My kids have food allergies, so if it’s candy often they can’t have it, and if it’s a toy it just ends up broken in the car on the way home from the party. So I found instructions on how to make foam light sabers, and made them as party favors. Simple and inexpensive! Cut a pool noodle in half, slap on some duct tape and electrical tape, and you’re golden. Bonus is, they don’t hurt when your kids beat the tar out of each other in preparation for Jedi Training. 🙂

Seriously, who doesn’t love a lightsaber?

I put them in buckets for the kids to grab, along with some neon colored labels and a sharpie to make name tags. 

 

3. The Imperial Decree

I wanted to make sure the kids kept the lightsabers OUTSIDE so we made up this sign, one by the lightsabers, and one by the door at parent-height. I downloaded the Star Wars Font to make the sign.

 

4. The Padawan Robe

I googled around, and this Star Wars Robe tutorial was the easiest one I found. For 3yards of fabric, I was able to make two small robes (one for each of my kids) for less than $5 total.

my son loved it so much he would wear it everywhere, even to tae kwon do.

 

5. Death Star Pinata

We couldn’t find an actual Death Star or Star Wars themed pinata, so here is what we did instead. I bought a baseball pinata (any round pinata shape would do, actually), and my husband spray painted it silver. To cover the hole we had to cut in it to put in candy, we put an upside down coffee lid.  He added on details with a black sharpie, and it turned out pretty well!

 

6.  The Cake

The cake was extremely cool. I found this tutorial on how to make an R2D2 cake. My fabulous friend Auntie Heather’s Fancy Cakes made the cake for us.  I made the inside cake (dairy and nut free!) and she put it all together. It was glorious and oh so amazing.

 

Details of the cake.

This thing was incredibly awesome. People couldn’t believe it was cake! Here’s a picture of the cake cut apart, poor R2D2 is getting devoured by my youngest.

CAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAKKKKKKKKKKKKKEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

 

7. Star Wars Cooler

My husband’s coworker graciously loaned us his R2D2 cooler, which we used as a prop and to store “adult” beverages. My kids loved it and kept hugging it.

 

 

8. The Games

We played Jeidi vs. Bubbles (I had two parents with bubble machines, and the kids were fighing all the bubbles), which the kids really enjoyed. I made an obstacle course the kids had to run in, where I had parents holding lightsabers out either above head level, or low enough so the kids had to duck or jump over it, which they all LOVED. We also had Star Wars Bingo and a Pin The Lightsaber on Yoda game, but we didn’t get around to either of them. Mainly, this is what the entire party looked like.

 

 

Overall, I think everyone (parents, kids, birthday boy) had a great time, my son thought we were the coolest parents ever, and all the kids of all ages had a ton of fun chasing each other with their lightsabers. I hope if you’ve read this through, you got some good ideas for your own Star Wars themed party!

 

Shared at Spaceships and Laser Beams Boy Party Ideas!



breaker

{I am the Lorax, I Speak for the Trees} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

February 24th, 2012

We love Dr. Seuss in this household. So when I saw this cool truffula tree project on the Art Project For Kids website, I knew that the boys would love it. In additional, March 2 is  National Read Across America day, so grab The Lorax from the library, read the book, and have your kids […]

 

We love Dr. Seuss in this household. So when I saw this cool truffula tree project on the Art Project For Kids website, I knew that the boys would love it. In additional, March 2 is  National Read Across America day, so grab The Lorax from the library, read the book, and have your kids play with their own truffula trees! Also, I’m participating in the very cool Kids Weekly Co Op! (See the button at the end of the post for more link ups)

What you need:

for the trees:

  • Sticks
  • yarn (in various colors)
  • clay (green if you can find it)
  • glue (I prefer glue dots)
  • sharp scissors
  • egg cartons (optional)

 

for the Lorax

  • toilet paper tube
  • orange construction paper
  • yellow construction paper

 

First, we went outside and picked some sticks for our trees.

Then, we made pom poms for the wavy truffula leaves. This will require adult assistance.

 

The easiest way I found to have the kids make pom poms was to have them wrap the yarn around a fork.  You can also just wrap around your hand as well. Both kids loved the wrapping.

 

Hopefully this next sequence will make sense. After you wrap, you want to thread a needle around one side of the fork and loosely tie the yarn on top. Then, cut with SHARP scissors the other side and release the fork. Tighten up your knot, hold it pom pom side up and cut off any stragglers for a uniform look

We used yarn I had on hand – you can make your trees pretty much any color. Thicker/poofier yarn makes more flowy truffula trees. The yellow ones are made from baby yarn, I just had the boys wrap more around the fork to make it poof out.

 

 

I cut up an egg carton to help the trees stand better, but you can skip that step. What you want is to grab some clay (I had green clay on hand, you can use grey and paint it green), and stick your stick into the clay.

Then, stick your pom pom on top. The pom pom should easily slide on, through the knot you tied in the middle.

 

My youngest loved feeling the truffula trees against his cheek.

 

We made our Lorax by covering a toilet paper tube with orange construction paper and drawing him on, the yellow moustache was more construction paper.

 

And voila, our very own Lorax and his Truffula Tree Forest playscene.

 

Kids Co-op

breaker

{Leprechaun Trap!} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

February 21st, 2012

Now that the Valentines Day madness is behind us, we look forward to the next holiday and holiday madness. Last year, my boys really got into St. Patrick’s Day, and in particular, if leprechauns were real or not. I found this cool tutorial for a leprechaun trap, and we went to town! What you need: […]

 

Now that the Valentines Day madness is behind us, we look forward to the next holiday and holiday madness. Last year, my boys really got into St. Patrick’s Day, and in particular, if leprechauns were real or not. I found this cool tutorial for a leprechaun trap, and we went to town!

What you need:

  • Round container (I used a Quaker Oats container)
  • Green Paper, black paper, and yellow paper for decorations
  • Sticks (for the ladder)
  • Cotton Ball and Glitter (for the gold)
  • Pocket Knife

This was a pretty easy craft, I had the boys cut out shamrocks and do all the gluing and taping. I put the cotton ball inside a box, let them coat it in watered down glue (to soak into the cotton ball), then glitter the heck out of it. **NOTE** Do this outdoors or it’ll look like a glitter bomb went off in your house. Then we found sticks and hot glued them together to make the ladder.

 

Here is what our finished trap looked like! The sign was very important, as we read that leprechauns don’t like to be told what NOT to do.

Here was the hole we put on top, then we put the “gold nugget” to cover up the hole. The theory was, leprechaun would see the sign, climb up the ladder to take the gold, then fall in and be trapped! 

We put the trap outside the boys’ bedroom window. Here they are eagerly waiting for the leprechaun

And…here is what they discovered. Leprechauns can bust out of traps! You can tell by the outline of the leprechaun the next day. He did however leave some green footprints, and quarters for the boys.

 

Photobucket

Lasso the Moon