Posts Tagged ‘arts and crafts’

{Rock Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

July 17th, 2013

If your kids are anything like mine, they like to collect things like rocks. (And sticks. Sometimes I get a surprise and it’s something that’s alive such as a worm or beetle. Or baby spiders, although that is totally another post once I recover from the trauma). Then, when you try to tell them that […]

 

If your kids are anything like mine, they like to collect things like rocks. (And sticks. Sometimes I get a surprise and it’s something that’s alive such as a worm or beetle. Or baby spiders, although that is totally another post once I recover from the trauma). Then, when you try to tell them that their “treasures” belong outside the house, you get tears and lots and lots of wailing. Here’s a simple craft you can do to occupy them, decorate up their “treasure” rocks, plus it’s actually pretty fun. As an added bonus, I even convinced mine that the pretty rocks can stay outside and not clutter up their rooms, or be used as projectiles for sibling battles. My boys love rock painting, we do it several times a year, for all holidays, rainy day activities, or even just for fun on a sunshiney day.

What You’ll Need:

  • rocks (cleaned and dry – my kids love giving their rocks a “bath”)
  • paint (we used tempura and acrylic)
  • brushes (don’t be limited to just paint brushes. We also used pencil top erasers, toothpicks, and q-tips as “brushes”)
  • **optional** you can also use glue and glitter on your rocks as well!

 

Start off with some clean and DRY rocks

Our painting set up. I have box lids for the actual rock painting, just so there’s not accidental floor paintage

Then, get your paint. I set mine out in paper plates for my boys.

Then, let them paint!

Here’s what dot painting with a pencil end looks like as well.

Some of our finished creations.

My oldest was super proud of his Captain America shield rock.

We even glittered some rocks to make them look like real “treasures”

In rock land, Hello Kitty and Batman live side by side in peace

We painted some to look like caterpillers and bugs

And my youngest loves all things ladybugs. Happy crafting!

rockpaintingsb1

This post is shared with:

Parentwin and her Craft Central Station

Lasso the Moon

breaker

{Sponge Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

July 5th, 2013

I’m always looking for fun art ideas for both boys, so when my oldest chose this Usbourne Art book from the store recently, I was really pleased with all the different art techniques it encompassed inside. The techniques vary from beginner to advance, and I was able to adapt some of them for my younger […]

 

I’m always looking for fun art ideas for both boys, so when my oldest chose this Usbourne Art book from the store recently, I was really pleased with all the different art techniques it encompassed inside. The techniques vary from beginner to advance, and I was able to adapt some of them for my younger son to do as well. One of them was  printing, using an eraser. I didn’t have any big erasers on hand to cut up, but I did have sponges, so we cut up a couple of sponges into body parts, and printed and painted away. It was a HUGE hit. It occupied both boys for about an hour, printing out their little people with the sponges, printing out designs, and putting in details with markers and crayons. I would highly recommend it as a good way to learn about body parts, pattern recognition, and just some plain old messy fun!

What You’ll Need

  • sponges
  • paint
  • paper
  • scissors
  • **optional** markers or crayons to draw in more features or details
  • **optional** big erasers instead of sponges

 

Isn’t this just adorable?

spongepainting14

 

My pile of cut sponges (this is two different kitchen sponges cut)

spongepainting10

 

You can see how I marked off the sponge to cut out my body parts, and what an assembled sponge person looked like at the end.

spongepainting11

My kids did spend some time just playing with the sponges, making people, rabbits, and other shapes as well before we started painting. A by-product I didn’t expect, I ended up letting them play with the cut sponges in a bowl of water when they were finished painting as well.

spongepainting1

 

Dip sponge into paint. Press into paper.

spongepainting9

 

It was fun cutting out different shapes as well, I cut out a triangle body here.

spongepainting2

 

Dip, press, then add details with markers.

spongepainting4

 

Have plenty of rags on hand, as my kids also started to sponge paint themselves as well.

spongepainting3

 

Look at that concentration!

spongepainting5

 

Dip, press, add details with marker. And repeat.

spongepainting12

 

Check out the final results! A pogo jumping man. A diver in a pool. All from the same pile of sponges.

spongepainting8

 

Cowabunga!

spongepainting13

 

The fun thing about sponges is that, you can bend them to make bendy arms and legs as well.

spongepainting6

 

You can also use different colors, my oldest here made our family. Happy crafting!

spongepainting7
Lasso the Moon

 

This post is shared with:

Monday Kids RoundUp at The Jenny Evolution

breaker

{Preschool Pen Pals} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

June 19th, 2013

A couple of years ago, a friend of mine came to visit Seattle and brought along her adorable little daughter. She and my youngest (who are similarly aged), got along fabulously. When she contacted me about a cool project she had in mind about keeping them in contact, I was delighted to tell my youngest […]

 

A couple of years ago, a friend of mine came to visit Seattle and brought along her adorable little daughter. She and my youngest (who are similarly aged), got along fabulously. When she contacted me about a cool project she had in mind about keeping them in contact, I was delighted to tell my youngest about it, and he was all over the idea of keeping in touch with his buddy.

Basically, her idea was based off of the The Flat Stanley Project, which in turn is based off the Flat Stanley book. Flat Stanley encourages children to write letters, mailing their own “Flat Stanley” to friends and relatives. Not only does it teach kids about writing, reading, and geography, but it’s pretty fun because let’s face it, who doesn’t love receiving mail? If you have a preschool aged child, this is a wonderful project because instead of writing letters, you can practice with taking pictures, and then having your child write a few words (like their name, or city, or their friend’s name). My friend names her the “Flat D” project, and mailed us a picture she made of her daughter. She drew a picture, glued a real photo of her daughter’s face, and laminated the whole thing when it was mailed to us. On our end, we took “Flat D.” around town, with us on camping trips, and wrote a few words about it. My youngest was super excited to have an opportunity to have a preschool pen pal to share pictures and his adventures with from the summer. I really enjoyed this project because with the picture taking, we were able to make a list of what he wanted to show “Flat D.”, and he wasn’t frustrated by his lack of writing skills. In turn, my youngest enjoyed playing tour guide with his very own agenda (instead of mom or dad’s) around town, telling me important things about Seattle and surrounding areas that we needed to show “Flat D”. Most of all, he enjoyed having a preschool aged “pen pal” of his own. It was a great project!

What You’ll Need:

 

My youngest and his new bud, “D”. Aren’t they sweet?

penpals16

 

He was super excited when “Flat D.” came to town, we immediately had to take her to the playground.

penpals4

 

“I love her mommy! I want to show her everything!”

penpals10

 

We took her to show her some of the highlights of our town, including the blue trees.

penpals9

 

Here you can see how “Flat D.” was made, she was very hardy for all the travels.

penpals8

 

She even went camping and visited Deception Pass.

penpals3

 

Hello “Flat D.”!

penpals2

 

My preschooler was brave and took her out on the canoe as well.

penpals1

 

It was fun playing tourist in my own town, with my preschooler being in charge of the agenda. We went to the “dancing stage” at the Seattle Center.

penpals7

 

We visited the statuary in front of the Seattle Childrens Theatre.

penpals14

 

We checked out the oversized exhibit at The Pacific Science Center.

penpals15

 

Don’t be scared, “Flat D.”, it’s not a real dinosaur.

penpals11

 

We checked out a game of vertical tic tac toe. I think my preschooler was winning. 🙂

penpals12

 

He also had “Flat D.” check out the mechanical kinetic water shooters. She went “oooooOOOOoooo”.

penpals5

 

Goodbye, “Flat D.” Thanks for visiting! Maybe this summer, we’ll make a “Flat A.” and mail him to you to visit! 🙂

penpals13
Lasso the Moon

 

This post is shared with:

A Favorite Thing

Monday Kid Corner Round Up

breaker

{Sandpaper Art T-Shirts} Seattle Area Childrens Photographer

May 29th, 2013

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the […]

 

Father’s Day is coming up soon here in the States, and my boys really wanted to create something to give their dad. I found this tutorial for transferring a crayon drawing on sandpaper onto a plain white T-shirt, and the instructions looked really, really simple. We first tried it out with some shirts for the boys, and the results were great! Not only was it incredibly easy to do, it took very little supervision from me, and the final result was  beautiful. Now the boys are super excited to design one for dad for Father’s Day! PLEASE NOTE: since you will be transferring the picture upside down from your sandpaper, the image on the T-shirt will be a mirror image of what your child drew. So, I would stay away from any words (which will get transferred on backwards), and stick to simple images.

What You’ll Need

  • sandpaper (I used both coarse 60 grit, and a finer 220 grit. coarser will get you more texture, finer will let you get more details in your drawing)
  • crayons
  • white t shirts
  • iron
  • paper towel or regular towel
  • ***IMPORTANT*** since the drawing will be placed backwards to be ironed onto the t shirt, whatever you draw will be mirrored on the t shirt. So it is best NOT to draw any words.

 

This is all you’ll need for this craft (minus the iron). The two different sandpaper is a bonus – you can get away with one type!

sandpapertshirt3

 

 First, draw your picture onto the sandpaper. I let my youngest use the coarser grit sandpaper.

sandpapertshirt4

 

My oldest wanted more details in his drawing, so I let him have the finer grit sandpaper.

sandpapertshirt1

 

My youngest and his finished sandpaper drawing. He wanted to fill up his whole piece of sandpaper.

sandpapertshirt8

 

He didn’t really believe me that it would print onto the t shirt.

sandpapertshirt5

 

Second, place your sandpaper upside down on your t shirt, and iron on the COTTON setting (with no steam). I also placed a paper towel in between the t shirt to make sure there was no bleed through. I ironed for about 2 minutes, the coarser sandpaper took longer than the finer grit one. Just keep lifting up to check to make sure the crayon has melted onto the shirt.

sandpapertshirt9

 

Voila! That is it, two easy steps! That is how you make a sandpaper art t shirt. To “set” your design, take a paper towel (or a cotton towel), and iron for about 20 seconds on top of your crayon design.

sandpapertshirt2

 

A close up of my older son’s design. I love the surf boards.

sandpapertshirt7

 

Happy, happy kids! They loved that they were able to make their own shirts, and tell people they designed it themselves. Next, we are working on a design for dad’s shirt for Father’s Day (SHHHHHH don’t tell him). Happy Crafting!

sandpapertshirt6

 

This post is shared with:

Lasso the Moon

 

Monday Kid Corner Round Up

Making The World Cuter

Craftastic Mondays

Made By You Mondays

Mad Skills Party

It’s Party Time

Get Your Craft On

Tutorial Tuesday

We Did It Wednesday

Wow Me Wednesday

Whatever Goes Wednesday

Create Share Post

Whatever You Want Wednesday

Rock N Share

Share Your Creations

Made By Me

Blog Stalking Thursday

Catch A Glimpse

Inspiration Gallery

Friday Flash Blog

Weekend Wander

Flaunt It Friday

Weekend Wander – While He Was Napping

Anything Goes

BFF Linky Party

The Weekly Creative

breaker

{Spin Art} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 24th, 2013

In the summer, one of the things my kids love to do is go to the state fair. There, besides the carnival rides and gorging on cotton candy, they love doing the Spin Art. I dutifully bought one of the Spin Art machines, only to find that a) paint got EVERYWHERE,  b) my younger son […]

 

In the summer, one of the things my kids love to do is go to the state fair. There, besides the carnival rides and gorging on cotton candy, they love doing the Spin Art. I dutifully bought one of the Spin Art machines, only to find that a) paint got EVERYWHERE,  b) my younger son couldn’t really use it without major, MAJOR supervision and c) the machine broke easily with enthusiastic usage. When I found this method of “spin art” online, I was pleased as punch to try to put it in action. All I needed was a salad spinner, which I sent my husband to look for at a thrift store. It worked beautifully, the paint mess was contained, and my preschooler-aged son LOVED the process. As some added side bonuses, we got to learn about some color mixing when we had some primary colors blend together in the salad spinner, we got to talk about centrifugal (or spinning) force, and we started on some cool Father’s Day cards. I would highly recommend this craft for toddlers on up to elementary aged kids as well!

What You’ll Need:

  • Salad Spinner (we got ours at the thrift shop for $2.50!)
  • paint (use a variety! we used both watercolors, tempura, and acrylics to see which “spins” the best)
  • paper (a heavier paper, like a watercolor paper, is better because it didn’t fly up during the spinning process. If you use regular sheet paper, I would tape two together to make it heavier).
  • experiment with your paper shapes inside the spinner. we cut out both squares and circles. I liked the look of the squares, but my son and both agreed the circles ended up looking the coolest.

 

Stick the paper inside the bottom of the spinner, then have your kiddo sploosh some paint on the inside.  This was acrylic paint. I let my preschooler choose whatever color combinations he wanted to pick.

spinart5

 

Set the top, and spin! This was my preschooler’s FAVORITE part. I cannot stress enough how much he enjoyed the pumping of the spinning top. We have another salad spinner which has a rotating spinner, but the pumping spinner was the hands down winner.

spinart4

 

Pretty! The acrylic paint was heavier, and didn’t “spin” as far as we thought it would.

spinart3

 

Here is where we experimented with watercolors, and round paper. I love how the black and white mixed to form grey. We did some other color mixing as well, and it turned into an impromptu color mixing lesson. I think the one on the right looks like the earth.

spinart2

 

This one is my favorite. I love how it looks almost like a flower pattern. We made quite a few more, and are going to use it to make cards for Father’s Day. Next time, we’re going to try to figure out how to add paint while it is actually spinning. Overall, this was a fun craft, and when my older son came home he immediately wanted to do his own “spin art” as well. Four thumbs up!

spinart1

 

This post is shared with:

 

Monday Kid Round Up

 

 

 

 

Lasso the Moon

breaker

{Party Minecraft Style} Seattle Area Child Photographer

May 23rd, 2013

My oldest recently turned eight, and this year, he asked for a Minecraft themed birthday. If you’ve never heard of Minecraft, think back to those old, 80s style DOS games and graphics. Minecraft looks totally like that. Except, this game only came out a few years ago. The good thing about Minecraft is that it […]

 

My oldest recently turned eight, and this year, he asked for a Minecraft themed birthday. If you’ve never heard of Minecraft, think back to those old, 80s style DOS games and graphics. Minecraft looks totally like that. Except, this game only came out a few years ago. The good thing about Minecraft is that it is totally easy to recreate, as everything is made out of pixelated blocks. The basic premise of the game is that the main character, Steve, goes around and digs, or “mines”. There is dirt, coal, and eventually, diamonds. You get a pick ax. There are also monsters like creepers, zombies, ghasts, and these spider things which I hate. All in block form, which kind of make them hilarious. The great thing about Minecraft is that you can make it as simple or as complicated as you want to, because you can program your own world.  So for kids like mine, it’s a great game to flex out their computer programming skills!

I spent some time on the Internet researching “Minecraft Parties”, and it basically came down to two things. 1) there was nothing pre-made for Minecraft, unless I wanted to pay  big bucks on Etsy, and 2) it’s all about blocks and paper, and I could do it myself. So with three or four days of prep time, lots of printing, gluing, and taping, I put together a Minecraft party for my kiddo. We wanted it low key, so we only invited eight people since he was turning eight, had one scavenger hunt, one craft (freeze paper stenciling their creeper shirts to take home as their “favor”), and lots and lots of fun! I hope you enjoy the party!

Some specifics:

 

Some of the decorations. The happy birthday banner, and of course, creepers and ghasts. The boys cut out the square clouds for the background.

minecraft10

 

TNT! aka licorice and juice boxes with red construction paper wrapped around it, and TNT printed in the Minecrafter font. You can see my minecraft paper blocks in the background. They were a huge hit.

minecraft12

 

More ghasts. They’re a combination ghost/octopus. I made them from square paper plates, with crepe paper legs. Totally easy!

minecraft7

 

These were the creeper plates. The green plates I glued the black construction creeper faces, then I glued a clear plate on top so people could actually use the plates to eat.

minecraft15

 

And of course, we had creeper juice (water bottles with “creeper juice” in Minecrafter font on white paper labels) to go along with the food. Renaming the food with Minecraft labels was really fun. The kids totally loved coming back for more “creeper juice” or “coal” or “torches” instead of regular old pretzels and blackberries and water.

minecraft3

 

My “coal”, aka blackberries.

minecraft2

 

My “torches”, aka pretzels. I was cracking up,  since the kids had a blast with the torches. I also had raspberries on a separate plate. So kids were putting raspberries on top of the pretzels and telling me “look! it’s a lit torch now!” I had three separate kids tell me that, all at different times. 🙂

minecraft1

 

What the final food set up looked like. (big thanks to L.Hong for providing me with this picture!) Besides the TNT (licorice), torches (pretzels), coal (blackberries), I also had chocolate cake with green frosting for dirt squares, and green rice krispie squares that they could stick together to make their own creeper. Also raspberries to light the torches. 😉 For the grown ups we had Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches, eggrolls, chips and hummus.

minecraft9

 

The banner is made of foam, I cut out the squares on top to make it more “minecraft-y”. The letters are felt letters I bought at Michael’s. I stapled the whole thing to crepe paper, and was pretty amazed it held. My kiddo asked for it to stay up all week, and (knock on wood), it hasn’t fallen down yet!

minecraft8

 

We also stuck some creepers outside. I made them from square plates. One plate for the head. I cut one plate in half for the body, and half of one for the feet. It was a big hit, different kids would run around with them in the yard, chasing each other.

minecraft11

 

My husband had this great idea of making the kids do a scavenger hunt before they got cake. In the spirit of Minecraft, they had to find different colored blocks to make up different combinations. (We had a whiteboard listing all the combinations and rules, but the kids took it over during the course of the game before I could snap a picture). They could trade with each other to make their combinations, and get cake. In reality, we hide 204 of these one-inch foam blocks in our yard and let them go forth and find them. It was great fun! I’m not sure which was more impressive, that they spent so long finding them, or that we actually got all 204 blocks back at the end of the party.

minecraft13

 

The kids had to have six blocks in different color combinations in order to get cake. Here’s some of the different combinations they came up with during the scavenging.

minecraft4

 

CAKE! I just had the cake made with green grass on top. There is a little Lego Steve and Lego creeper there as well from the Lego Minecraft set.

minecraft14

 

Since it was my son’s 8th birthday and not my birthday, I didn’t stress too much about planning games or entertaining the kids. They ran around in the yard, played in our tree house, and fought with the paper plate creepers. 🙂

minecraft5

 

Instead of party favors in a bag, we had everyone make their own Creeper Shirts! (we used the freezer paper method). I did two groups, the “happy face” creepers, and the “frowny face” creepers. The shirts were $3 at Michael’s, so very cheap, and the kids LOVED them! It was also a VERY EASY CRAFT to do with a large group of kids.

minecraft6

 

Overall, there was a lot of prep work in the few days before the party (especially in regards to all the paper crafting), but it was a lot of fun. Because in the end, it’s just about a bunch of blocks. 🙂 PARTY ON, I hope you enjoyed the pictures, and got some good ideas about any future Minecraft parties!

 

This post is shared with:

Whimsy Wednesday

Inspiration Gallery

Catch A Glimpse

Blog Stalking Thursday

Friday Flash Blog

Weekend Wonders

Flaunt It Friday

Weekend Wander

Hooking up with HoH

Simply Create

Live Laugh Linky

BFF Open House

Feathered Nest Friday

Fabulously Creative Friday

Anything Goes

Frugalicious Friday

Feature Friday

breaker

{Cornstarch Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 16th, 2013

If you’ve visited my blog  before, you should know that my boys love art, especially painting. Buying paint all the time for projects can get pricey, so when I saw this easy way to make my own paint from just stuff I had at home, I was all over it. It takes cornstarch, water, and […]

 

If you’ve visited my blog  before, you should know that my boys love art, especially painting. Buying paint all the time for projects can get pricey, so when I saw this easy way to make my own paint from just stuff I had at home, I was all over it. It takes cornstarch, water, and food coloring to make your own paint. You have to play with the ratio of cornstarch to water. I think our ratio was one tablespoon of cornstarch to one cup of water. I started with one tablespoon of cornstarch and added in water until it got to a watercolor-paint like consistency. If you want a thicker consistency like tempura paint, I would go with 1/2 or 2/3 cup of water. Then, since it was a beautiful day, I set the boys up outside with butcher paper laid out on the driveway, and let them go to town. They had sooooo much fun. I was pleasantly surprised at how bright the colors in the cornstarch paint turned out. In the end, the boys ended up mixing all the colors together to a muddy brown, ditched the paint brushes, and painted with their hands and feet.  Overall, it was fun, messy, creative, and colorful. We hung up the finished painting in the garaged and labeled it “Our World”.

What You’ll Need:

  • cornstarch (arrowroot powder may work as well, but I haven’t tested it)
  • water
  • food coloring
  • paintbrushes
  • some sort of cup to hold it
  • **optional** muffin tin or other holder to hold it for transport

Again, our ratio was 1 tablespoon cornstarch : 1 cup water. You can play with the ratio to the consistency you desire.

 

We mixed our cornstarch paint in cups, then I put the cups in a muffin tin for easier transport. Look at the colors!

cornstarchpaintSB7

 

I was amazed at how vivid the colors showed up once the boys started painting. Look at the tasty watermelons.

cornstarchpaintSB1

 

Of course, then they started to experiment with painting with their hands as well.

cornstarchpaintSB3

 

It made for great sensory play!

cornstarchpaintSB2

 

It was a warm weekend, so perfect for some outdoor painting. I laid out a big roll of butcher paper outside for them to paint. I also stripped them down for easier clean up afterwards. They were totally into the process.

cornstarchpaintSB4

My oldest just started dipping his hands into the cup for full immersion. I think he was starting to channel his inner Jackson Pollack.

cornstarchpaintSB5

 

Then, they both got into the full body, painting action. Overall, it was an easy, cheap (!), and fun way to paint! Happy painting!

cornstarchpaintSB6
Lasso the Moon I Was Featured at The Weekly Kids Co-Op

breaker

{Musical Painting} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

May 5th, 2013

Something that seems to be put on the backburner in education these days is emphasis on the arts and music. I read this awesome article about the principal who placed art teachers back in his school and thought yeah, that’s what I’m talking about! I wish more schools operated that way. I’m always looking for […]

 

Something that seems to be put on the backburner in education these days is emphasis on the arts and music. I read this awesome article about the principal who placed art teachers back in his school and thought yeah, that’s what I’m talking about! I wish more schools operated that way. I’m always looking for activities which combine my preschooler’s need for sensory input, along with anything that encourages art or music. When I found this activity on Pinterest for musical painting, I thought it was the GREATEST THING EVER. It was relatively simple, incorporated sensory inputs through sound and touch, let my preschooler paint, and the supplies were minimal. It went better than I expected! My preschooler is obsessed with the sound of jingle bells, and he loved stroking the fuzziness of the pipe cleaners as well. He spent quite a bit of time mixing paints, and listening to the jingle bells, before he painted his picture. (as a bonus lesson, I just set out the three primary colors for him, and had him mix the rest of the colors he wanted to use. He really enjoyed the color mixing!)

I would consider this a success, and will totally pull this project out again another day!

What You’ll Need:

  • paintbrushes
  • pipe cleaners
  • bells

The supplies.

musicpainting5

 

Thread the bell onto the pipe cleaner. I did three bells on each pipe cleaner per paint brush.

musicpainting4

 

Then, wrap the pipe cleaner around the top of the paint brush. You’re done!

musicpainting3

 

Then, let your kid paint. My preschooler loved hearing the bells jingle as he mixed the paints. He spent a good twenty minutes just mixing paints to hear the jingle sounds before actually painting. I started with just primary colors (blue, red, yellow) and had him make the rest for his art through color mixing.

musicpaintingSB1

 

Painting and making music.

musicpainting8

 

He would stop every so often to feel the fuzziness of the pipe cleaner as well. So many sensory sensations!

musicpainting7

 

The aftermath. Totally worth it, this activity occupied him for about 45 minutes.

musicpainting6

 

Ta-dah! The finished painting, it’s a dad and a kid walking in the sunshine. 🙂 Go forth now, and do your own musical painting today!

musicpaintingSB2
Lasso the Moon

Inspiration Laboratories

breaker

{May Day Baskets} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

April 24th, 2013

April showers bring May flowers, as the old adage goes. I love getting flowers, and a tradition I also love is giving flowers on May Day (the first of May). Last year the boys and I made these cute paper cones as baskets, and left them for our neighbors. They loved the craft AND the […]

 

April showers bring May flowers, as the old adage goes. I love getting flowers, and a tradition I also love is giving flowers on May Day (the first of May). Last year the boys and I made these cute paper cones as baskets, and left them for our neighbors. They loved the craft AND the giving, and are already asking to do it again. It is a simple little thing, but my boys got a huge kick out of leaving the little baskets for all of our neighbors and friends. Try your hand at making your own May Day baskets, and filling them with flowers, whether it be flowers from your garden, or painted flowers your child made, or hand crafted flowers. The gesture will be much appreciated!

 

We started off with some pretty cardstock. You can probably use scrapbook paper, but I wanted something a little sturdier for my paper cones.

20120430_003WM

 

I measured a semi-circle with a compass (or, you can just eyeball it), and had my boys cut it. Then, we glued it. I used the clothespins to hold it shut as the glue dried. This year, I think we may use glue dots.

201205SB1WM

 

From the leftover cardstock paper, we made tags for our paper cones that said “Happy May Day!”

201205_014smallWM

 

Yes, these lilacs are from my yard. 🙂

201205_129WM

 

I punched holes in the side of the cone and threaded ribbon and the tags through,  in order to hold up the cones.

201205_125smallWM

 

Knock, knock!

201205_134smallWM

 

Happy May Day! Wouldn’t finding this on your door bring a smile to your face? 

201205_156WM

This post has been shared:

 

Lasso the Moon

 

Making the World Cuter 

Craftastic Monday

Made By You Mondays

Monday Fundays

It’s Party Time

Mad In Crafts

Get Your Craft On

Tutorial Tuesday

What’s It Wednesday

Wow Me Wednesday

Catch A Glimpse

Blog Stalking Thursday

Flaunt It Friday

No Rules Weekend Party

Say G’Day Saturday

The Weekly Creative

Party Junk

A Favorite Thing

 Serenity Saturday

A Pinteresting Party

Weekend Wonders

Show and Tell Saturday

Weekend WrapUp

Get Schooled

breaker

{Upcycled Rubber Bracelets} Seattle Area Lifestyle Photographer

April 17th, 2013

Living in the beautiful PNW, we’re incredibly lucky that we have access to beautiful scenery and bike trails. We’re a big biking family, whether it be a short trip around the block, or a family bike ride on the trail, plus it’s a fun and easy way to get some family time. My husband is […]

 

Living in the beautiful PNW, we’re incredibly lucky that we have access to beautiful scenery and bike trails. We’re a big biking family, whether it be a short trip around the block, or a family bike ride on the trail, plus it’s a fun and easy way to get some family time. My husband is the big biking advocate in the family, and he took the boys to the annual Seattle Bike Expo, where they got see cool trick riding by Ryan Leech, see the latest in bike innovations, and also came home with these nifty, funky bracelets. Once I realized that they were just made from inner bike tubes, and that we had those at home, I totally recreated them for the boys to make some more (and some for me, too!). This is a great craft to help celebrate Earth Day. It’s also a fairly easy craft, made for some fun jewelry, plus the boys got to wear something to symbolize the bike riding they loved.

What You’ll Need:

  • inner bike tubes
  • snaps
  • snap setter (I used this Snap Setter)
  • paint or Sharpie Paint Pens (OIL based, not the water based paint pens)
  • scissors
  • hammer

 

Can I just bottle the look of joy here on my oldest’s face? Can you also spot my preschooler peeking out from behind dad on the trail-a-long bike?

20120911_029WM

Our preschool took a trip to the Cascade Recycling Center recently. This is ALL recycling. Can you believe it? Less than 5% per year of what gets collected for recycling actually is garbage and not recycled by the Center. One of the things the recycling center does *not* take is rubber, so our project was a good use of the rubber of the inner bike tire tubes.

20130412_029smallWM

 

This is the inner bike tube.

20130413_005smallWM

 

You’re going to cut it, and make it long enough to fit across your wrist (make sure to account for length for the snap overlength). You can cut it in different widths as well.

braceletSB3

 

With the snaps put on it. You can leave the edges flat, or round it. You can see I made them in various widths, and left one side flat, and rounded

one side.

braceletSB2

 

Here are the Sharpie paint pens I used. I used the oil based, fine point, NON OPAQUE pens.

20130413_002smallWM

 

It made for a very fine point for drawing.  This method was better for me and for my older, elementary aged son, since it gave him more ability to get detailed in his drying. The pens were also quick drying to boot!

20130413_003smallWM

 

Another way to decorate is with stamps and paint. I used acrylic paint and rubber stamps.

20130417_001smallWM

 

The stamping method is good for toddlers and preschoolers to decorate. It does take overnight to dry.

braceletSB4

 

And the finished bracelet, this one was sharpie pen decorated.

20130413_008smallWM

 

Here are some stamped one. I also tested out velcro instead of snaps, but liked the look of the snaps better.

braceletSB1

 

Overall, a really fun project, and my kids LOVE their new, fun and funky upcycled bracelets!

20130417_004smallWM

 

This post is shared with:


Lasso the Moon


Made By You Mondays

Mad Skills Party

Get Your Craft On!

Tutotial Tuesday

What’s It Wednesday 

We Did It Wednesday

Wickedly Awesome Wednesday

 Wow Me Wednesday

Frugally Sustainable

 It’s Party Time

Say G’Day Saturday